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Am I at Risk for HIV from Oral Sex?

Question: 

Hi,

I'm currently dating this guy. I'm feeling really paranoid right now because we've been having sexual contact recently. The furthest we have gone is oral sex (giving and receiving unprotected) and him rubbing his penis (covered with a condom), and almost inserting it inside me. Yesterday, I was concerned because when I performed oral on him, there was precum but he didn't ejaculate. I only performed oral for a little bit. Afterwards, I became worried because I had sort of an open sore on the inside of my lip. It wasn't like a bleeding sore. I have a habit of biting my lip and peeling the old skin off so it sort of leaves a sore, but it doesn't bleed or anything. I heard that oral sex is a lower risk of getting HIV, but a huge risk is posed when the person performing oral has open sores or bleeding gums in their mouths. The guy I'm dating, before we ever became sexual with each other, I asked if he's clean and been tested for STD's. He replied that with him being in the military, they often test soldiers for stuff like HIV. So, he said he was clean. Now, I'm not familiar with the military and how often they get tested, but I still can't help but feel concerned because of my paranoia and worry about getting STD's. So, it's hard for me to take his word for it. Anyway, from what I have explained so far, could I be at risk for HIV? Should I get tested?

Answer: 

Hi there,

Thank you for your inquiry. From what we gather from the question, you were asking about the risk of HIV transmission from performing HIV on a person with unknown HIV status with the presence of a sore on the inside of your lip.

Performing oral sex without a barrier is considered to be an avenue of HIV transmission, only when certain conditions are met. For instance, HIV transmission in this case requires the presence of HIV positive fluid to come into direct contact with the blood stream (through a bleeding cut or sore in the mouth). Because you are worried about an open sore that is in your mouth, this scenario would be considered to be of Low Risk (evidence of transmission occurs through these activities when certain conditions are met).

For this reason, we would recommend HIV screening to reduce any confusion or worry surrounding this scenario and future encounters. It is always important to know your HIV status and HIV screening can provide you with a certain answer.

Recommendation Refer to Physician for HIV screening.

All the best,

AIDS Vancouver Online/Helpline, Cody