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Are my test conclusive?

Question: 

Hello:

On April 19th I had unprotected oral sex with a girl; she sucked me and I sucked her as well. Now I am very concerned about the real risk of got HIV. These were the tests I have done so far, and all of them got negative:
April, 22th - ELISA (negative)
May, 05th - CMIA (negative)
May, 11st - PCR (undetectable)
May, 21st - ELISA (negative)
Jun, 09th - ELISA (negative)
Jun, 15th - CMIA (negative)
Jun, 17th - NAT (negative)
Jul, 01st - NAT / Elisa (negative)
Jul, 27th - ELISA (negative)

Please, help me. Are these results conclusive or should I keep testing at least until six months? Thank you!

Answer: 

Hi there, thanks for contacting the AIDS Vancouver helpline with your HIV related questions and concerns. We're happy to help!

Just to clarify, I will outline the risks of oral sex for you. Receiving oral sex is considered to be a Negligible Risk. This means that although in theory it may be possible to acquire HIV this way, it doesn't pose much of a threat and there haven't been any confirmed cases of HIV transmission in this manner. Giving oral sex is considered to be a Low Risk activity. This means that there have been a few cases of HIV acquired in this manner, but they're usually under certain identifiable conditions. In the case of oral sex, an identifiable condition would be if you had recently had major dental surgery done that left open wounds in your mouth. If this was not the case, the risk is greatly diminished as normally the mouth is quite a protective environment against infections.

HIV tests are all considered to be conclusive at 12 weeks post exposure. You had several HIV tests over the course of the 3 months that were all negative, and so your last test was after 12 weeks, and is thus conclusive! Congrats on the negative test result!

There are only 4 situations that you'd need to continue testing until 6 months. those are as follows:

  • If you are on treatment for Hepatitis C

  • If you're on PEP/PREP for HIV

  • If you're being treated for cancer via Chemotherapy

  • If you have an immunodeficiency disease - you would know as these are serious and normally genetic diseases that are generally diagnosed at a young age.

If these don't apply to you, then your tests were conclusive and you don't need to continue testing for this exposure! i hope this helped!

Please visit avert.org for more information about HIV transmission and testing, and smartsexresource.com for more information about safe sex.

Sincerely,

Christina

AIDS Vancouver Online Helpline

helpline.aidsvancouver.org

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