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Blood in my fried chicken. Help me please

Question: 

Please help me with my concerns.

Im so stress because yesterday me and my wife bought a fried chicken, when we are already eating the chicken i notice some small blood in my chicken (neck part). I remember about deseases or viruses that human can get in bloods, like HIV. Im scared if i can get HIV from the blood of a chicken. What if the chicken is infected with hiv i know this sounds "funny" because i have some cuts in my lips due to cold weather. But as i remember when we buy the friend chicken it is deep fried in the pan, i saw it.. So please heres my questions.

My questions our:
*can chicken transmit hiv? Or be a carrier?
*do hiv survive in cooking like deep frie food?
*why does chicken can or cannot be infected by hiv? Is there any study about why chicken cannot carry this virus? Even if someone
intentionaly inject hiv blood in chicken?
*do i need test?

Note: sorry for my poor english, i hope you understand my situation. Thank you so much. I hope you can help my with my questions.

Answer: 

Hello,

Thank you for your inquiry. From what we gather from the question, you were asking about the possibility of HIV transmission from eating deep fried chicken with visible blood from the animal. From the information given, this scenario is determined to be No Risk (transmission of HIV is not possible in the given scenario).

The scenario mentioned above does not meet the three components of the Transmission Equation because there were no bodily fluids containing HIV. The HIV virus is unable to multiply and cause disease in most species other than humans (1). Since the 1980's, scientists have been trying to find an animal model that is able to get HIV to better study the disease (2). To do this, they injected small animals used in laboratory research with HIV to see if it would cause infection, but they found that the animals were not able to get the disease because they have a different immune response to the disease than humans (2,3). Since it was shown that HIV is unable to survive and multiply in most animals other than humans, there would likely not be enough HIV in the blood of a piece of deep fried chicken to lead to HIV transmission, even if someone injected it with the virus.

For your interest, laboratories are only able to study HIV in animals if the animals are genetically modified to have an immune system similar to that of humans (genetically modified mice). Scientists can also use a different virus that is similar to HIV, but cannot infect humans, such as using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in large primates like chimpanzees, or infecting cats using feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Note that this research is relatively uncommon due to the ethical and logistical issues involved in using larger animals for research.

Two other factors in this scenario that are important to note are the preparation of the food as well as the activity you were engaged in (i.e. eating). The food preparation would lead to exposure to oxygen, which would rapidly inactivate any HIV virus present (4). Also, in regards to the transmission equation, consuming food that may contain HIV is not a risky activity (5). According to the CDC, "Even if the food contained small amounts of HIV-infected blood or semen, exposure to the air, heat from cooking, and stomach acid would destroy the virus."

Recommendation: No need for an HIV test with the scenario provided, refer to a physician for other health related questions.

Regards,

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online, Marie