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confused after test . Steel tray and alcohol patch

Question: 

Hi

i went for a test , a blood test , She cleaned the place from where the blood was drawn with alcohol Patch twice, used new gloves , for blood drawing used butterfly blood drawing needle , but when she was removing the needle she used another alcohol patch to stop little blood that comes out when needle is removed , while removing so there was some blood coming out , and it touched alcohol patch and gloves , i am only worries as when she teared the cover of alcohol patch the patches she kept in the box where old patches were kept ( like its a steel tray , she threw the old patches and cotton from it used on previous patient , kept sealed patches in the same tray and then picked them up and used the patches on me )

can this cause HIV or ant STD

please reply

Answer: 

Hello, Thank you for your inquiry. From what we gather from the question, you were asking about your risk of acquiring HIV from the tools used while having your blood drawn. From the information given, this scenario is determined to be No Risk(transmission of HIV is not possible in the given scenario).

The scenario mentioned above does not meet the three components of the transmission equation(1). It does not satisfy the equation because:

  • For transmission to occur the three components of the HIV Transmission Equation must be met: there must be HIV present in a bodily fluid (ie: in blood, semen or rectal secretions), direct access to the bloodstream (ie: inside of the vagina, anus and other mucous membranes) paired with a high risk activity (ie: unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse, sharing needles, mother to child)(1).

  • HIV does not survive long outside the human body (such as on surfaces), and it cannot reproduce outside a human host(2).

For your scenario this means that you cannot acquire HIV from the alcohol patch used on you when the needle was removed, the glove used, the cover of the alcohol patch, or the steel tray on which the pads were kept. HIV is not transmitted by objects used in your blood draw. For transmission to occur the three components of the HIV Transmission Equation must be met: there must be HIV present in a bodily fluid (ie: in blood, semen or rectal secretions), direct access to the bloodstream (ie: inside of the vagina, anus and other mucous membranes) paired with a high risk activity (ie: unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse, sharing needles, mother to child)(1).

HIV does not survive long outside the human body (such as on surfaces), and it cannot reproduce outside a human host(2). This means that any blood or other bodily fluids on the alcohol patch, the gloves, the cover of the alcohol patch, or the steel tray on which the pads were kept had already been outside of the human body, exposed to external environmental conditions, unable to reproduce and unable to transmit to you. The needle prick wound that was bleeding, did not provide the conditions necessary for direct access for HIV to enter your bloodstream. Any cotton or alcohol pads that were used on the bleeding needle prick would not transmit HIV to you. This scenario is assessed as No Risk to you for acquiring HIV or an STI.

Recommendation: No need for HIV test with the scenario provided, refer to the resources we have linked below to learn more about HIV and HIV transmission. Refer to your healthcare professional for other health related questions.

Regards, AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online, Hilary