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Help! Negative test

Question: 

Hello good day! I'm from Brazil! Forgive me my weak English!
I had a high-risk exposure in which the condom was disrupted in vaginal sex. The girl I related was at the end of my period, but I did not notice visible blood on my penis. When I realized that I had broken I took it off and immediately went to wash. After 10 days of the act I began to feel symptoms that until the present date permance. The symptoms were: oral ulcers, rash, pharyngitis, shivering, body aches and pains, lack of appetite, white tongue, nail fungus, rough nails, peeling of hands and feet, nausea and vomiting, weight loss. I tested with RNA PCR and elisa 4th generation with 20, 33, 50, 70 and 80 and 90 days and gave undetectable and negative. I did another 120 day test and it turned out to be negative. I called the partner to test and she tested with a quick test on the 100 day mark and a 3rd generation Elisa in 120 days and she also came out negative. But I still have symptoms like white tongue, white throat secretion, rash and itching through the body. I am not satisfied with the test, as I fear late seroconversion. What advice can you give me? Thank you very much.

Answer: 

Hello and thank you for your inquiry.

We understand that you are concerned about the accuracy of multiple negative HIV test results that you have received.

According to your timeline, you have tested negative 7 times with a combination of NAAT PCR RNA Test (also known as an "early test"), and 4th Generation EIA Test. Your most recent negative result was at 120 days post-exposure.

The NAAT PCR RNA test detects viral RNA in the blood of individuals who have not yet developed detectable antibodies. The window period for this test is 2-3 weeks post exposure and this test is considered 90% accurate at 10-12 days, 95-98% accurate at 6 weeks, and 99.6% accurate from 12 weeks onward.

4th Generation EIA (aka DUO or COMBO or ab/ag) Tests can detect HIV infection in 50% of people by 18 days after infection; 95% of people by 34 days after infection; and 99% of people by one and a half months after infection. (1)

Since at least two of your negative test results exceed the 12 week mark, you can consider these results to be conclusive for this exposure.

While your symptoms do sound serious, they cannot be attributed to HIV considering your many negative test results. Late sero-conversion is extremely rare and it is unlikely you would experience symptoms from HIV at ten days post exposure in the case of late sero-conversion.

No further HIV testing is required. We recommend consulting your healthcare provider to explore other causes for your symptoms.

Regards, AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online, Dyson