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HIV testing required?

Question: 

I am a male and I had a sexual encounter with a female sex worker 14 weeks ago. We showered together and touched each other's genitals. After shower, I fingered her and played with her nipples and sucked on her nipples. Then she sucked on my penis with a condom on and I came inside the condom. I fingered her some more and touched her breast and tongue kissed her. I then masturbated myself without a condom and came again. That was the end of it. During the 12th week after exposure, I caught a flu. I had nasal congestion and sore throat and had chills for one night. I measured my temperature and I was not considered having a fever. The flu cured after a week or so. My questions are: 1) Can I get HIV from fingering her then touching her nipples with my hands and sucking on the nipples afterwards? 2) Can I get HIV from receiving oral sex with a condom on? 3) Can I get HIV from deep tongue kissing? 4) Internet research tells me normally HIV early symptoms show up 2-6 weeks after exposure. In my case, I experienced a flu 12 weeks after exposure. Is it even possible that this flu is related to HIV? 5) Do you think I should get tested?

Answer: 

Hello,

Thank you for your inquiry. From what we gather from the question, you were asking about the risk of acquiring HIV from fingering and receiving oral sex with a condom. From the information given, this scenario is determined to be Negligible Risk. There are no evidence or no documented cases of transmission. However, there is a theoretical possibility(For E.g.: Fingering, receiving oral sex because they do involve the exchange of body fluids)

In order to contract HIV the following conditions must be met: There must be HIV present in a bodily fluid. The five bodily fluids that carry the HIV virus include: blood, semen (including pre-ejaculate), vaginal fluids, breast milk, and rectal secretions. The bodily fluid containing HIV must have direct access to the bloodstream. This can be through cuts, tears, rips, mucous membranes, open sores, or needles. Transmission occurs through a risky activity in which the first two conditions are met. For example: condom less sex, sharing needles, unsafe tattoos or piercings, vertical transmission–from mother to child (in utero, during delivery, breastfeeding)

Usually someone will get a strong flu like illness, 2-6 weeks after infection. On the basis of your symptoms it is not feasible to conclude that it is due to HIV. Because HIV symptoms mirror other viral infections or can be due or explained by other things.

Recommendation: There are no evidence or no documented cases of transmission refer to Physician for more personalized answers.

Regards, AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online, (Vardah)