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HIV transmission from vaginal and anal fingering

Question: 

Hello. I recently had an encounter whereby a new partner who is unsure of his STI status fingered my vagina and anus. He touched his penis before doing this as he wanted to rub his penis onto my vagina but I rejected this as he didn't have any condoms. There was only a few seconds after touching his penis that he fingered me. I was worried about my risk because he told me that he used to be a male prostitute and didn't always use condoms. What is the likelihood of contracting HIV from this encounter?

Answer: 

Hello and thanks for contacting Aids Vancouver with your question.

It sounds like you are concerned about the likelihood of acquiring HIV from the described scenario.

From what you have told me you engaged in several sexual activities with a new partner who is unsure of his current STI status. Furthermore, he proceeded to touch his penis before he fingered both your vagina and anus. It is great that you did not put yourself in a position where you may of had unprotected vaginal intercourse as that is an activity that has been repeatedly associated with HIV infection. The sexual act of fingering either the vagina or the anus is distinguished as a Negligible Risk as there is an exchange of body fluids, but there has never been a confirmed report of this activity progressing to HIV.

When it comes to HIV transmission, there needs to be a body fluid, an activity such as unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse and a direct access for the virus to enter the bloodstream. Below I have attached an HIV Transmission Equation chart, which goes into further detail on these factors.

HIV TRANSMISSION EQUATION

BODY FLUID
+
ACTIVITY
+
DIRECT ACCESS TO BLOODSTREAM
• blood (including menstrual) • unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse • vagina
• semen • sharing needles • anus
• pre-cum • mother to child (in specific cases) • urethra in the penis
• rectal secretions • open cuts and sores (in theory)
• vaginal fluids • other mucosal membranes
• breast milk • points of needle injection

= RISK OF HIV TRANSMISSION

If you are concerned about your current STI status, it might be helpful for you to partner with your personal doctor so that you can pursue testing and keep your current status up to date.

For more information on HIV you can visit What are HIV and AIDS.

Regards,

Chris, Volunteer

AIDS Vancouver Online Helpline
helpline.aidsvancouver.org
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