« Go Back

HIV Transmition

Question: 

Hello,

I have a questions I want to ask. My questions are;

1. If I touch body fluids like blood on objects like door knobs, tap, chair, clothes, cutlery... then immediately I remove the scab of my pimple, and it starts to bleed. Now the pimple is bleeding after removing the scab, then touch the bleeding pimple?

2. From the HIV Transmition Equation, I have confusion on how it works. The comfusion is under ACTIVITY. The activities involved for there to be HIV transmition, or for a person to contract the virus are;

- Unprotected anal/ vaginal sex
- Sharing needles
- Mother to child.

Now my question is, does this means that HIV is only contracted through these activities (unprotected anal/ vaginal sex and sharing needles), and if I'm not engaged or involved in these activities i'm safe from HIV, and I have no risk of contracting the virus? And I don't have to be worried about HIV?
And this is because for there to be a transmition, the virus must be passed or transmitted "human-to-human" without exposure to air/ oxygen?

Thanks.

Answer: 

Hi there, and thanks a lot for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline for you HIV/AIDS related health information. Let's answer your questions!

HIV TRANSMISSION EQUATION

BODY FLUID
+
ACTIVITY
+
DIRECT ACCESS TO BLOODSTREAM
• blood (including menstrual) • unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse • vagina
• semen • sharing needles • anus
• pre-cum • mother to child (in specific cases) • urethra in the penis
• rectal secretions • open cuts and sores (in theory)
• vaginal fluids • other mucosal membranes
• breast milk • points of needle injection

= RISK OF HIV TRANSMISSION

Questions 1: "1. If I touch body fluids like blood on objects like door knobs, tap, chair, clothes, cutlery... then immediately I remove the scab of my pimple, and it starts to bleed. Now the pimple is bleeding after removing the scab, then touch the bleeding pimple?"

  • HIV is a Human-to-Human virus. It cannot be transmitted to you by an object (door knobs, tap, chair, clothes, cutlery)

  • HIV needs a human host to survive. Once HIV is outside of the body and exposed to oxygen it can no longer transmit. Any bodily fluids on those item would be outside of the body, exposed to oxygen and could no longer transmit HIV.

  • HIV needs direct access to your bloodstream in order to transmit. There was no direct access to your bloodstream. Superficial cuts, such as a pimple with no scab, simply do not provide the conditions necessary for transmission to occur. For superficial cuts to potential provide direct access to the bloodstream, they would have to be actively bleeding and in need of stitches or surgery to repair. From what I understand, this was not the case in your situation.

Question 2: "Now my question is, does this means that HIV is only contracted through these activities (unprotected anal/ vaginal sex and sharing needles), and if I'm not engaged or involved in these activities i'm safe from HIV, and I have no risk of contracting the virus? And I don't have to be worried about HIV? And this is because for there to be a transmition, the virus must be passed or transmitted "human-to-human" without exposure to air/ oxygen?"

  • The activities listed in the HIV Transmission Equation are known High Riskactivities. We know that a significant number of scientific studies have repeatedly associated the activities with HIV. There have been a lot of confirmed reports of infection in this way.

  • There are other activities that have demonstrated to lead to HIV transmission, but on a lower risk scale. Please visit our Risk Assessment Chart for a break down of the risk levels of various activities.

  • Yes, HIV is a Human-to-Human virus. It cannot be transmitted to you by an object. HIV needs a human host to survive. Once HIV is outside of the body and exposed to oxygen it can no longer transmit.

I would encourage you to check out the following resources about HIV:

Thank you for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline.

Hilary

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online

helpline.aidsvancouver.org