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Kissing and masturbatiion risks

Question: 

Hi,

I have two 'risk' scenarios I'm concerned about.

The first is from mutual masturbation. A guy wanked me and I'm not sure if he had precum on his hands from his own penis when he touched me. He rubbed the head of my penis with his fingers, including the tip (urethra). What is my risk from this?

The second is with a guy I know who has had bareback anal sex (insertive) and has never tested for any STI's. He tried to kiss me last week and slipped his tongue in my mouth twice. I had a very sore ulcer on the roof of my mouth. Just under two weeks later and I have had severe headaches, body aches, particularly my neck and shoulders, but going down to my arms and also in my wrist and hands. I don't feel any lymph nodes swollen but the pain moves from area to area and I've also had bad nausea, too. Is this ARS? I've not had any fever or rash.

many thanks!

Answer: 

Hi there, and thanks a lot for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline for you HIV/AIDS related health information.

It sounds like you are concerned about your risk of HIV transmission from non-insertive mutual masturbation as well as kissing with a a sore ulcer in your mouth.

Both of the scenarios that you have described are No Risk situations. Here are some of the reasons why:

  • HIV needs a human host to survive. Once HIV is outside of the body and exposed to oxygen it can no longer transmit. Any bodily fluids on the other person's hands when he touched your penis was outside of the body, exposed to oxygen and therefore could not longer transmit HIV.

  • Saliva has an enzyme that inhibits the transmission of HIV.

  • HIV needs direct access to your bloodstream in order to transmit. There was no direct access to your bloodstream. Superficial cuts, such as the ulcer in your mouth, simply do not provide the conditions necessary for transmission to occur. For superficial cuts to potential provide direct access to the bloodstream, they would have to be actively bleeding and in need of stitches or surgery to repair. From what I understand, this was not the case in your situation.

HIV presents itself differently in different people, therefore we cannot comment on the symptoms that you have been experiencing. HIV is not diagnosed based on symptoms. I would, however, recommend that you contact your health care provider to discuss your symptoms and develop a treatment plan. Symptoms can be indicative of other viral infections.

Here at AIDS Vancouver we encourage everyone to make HIV testing a part of their regular health care maintenance routine. The only way to know your status is to be tested. When you visit your health care provider you can ask for an HIV test and know your status.

I would encourage you to check out the following resources about HIV:

Thank you for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline.

Hilary

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online

helpline.aidsvancouver.org