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Kissing with potential blood to blood lips?

Question: 

Hello, I have a bit of a problem I am going through with my mind running in the possibility I contracted HIV. Based on my extensive research I have done, I am quite certain I am in the safezone, but was not able to find anyone with the same situation I had. The other night, I was at a strip club, and a girl offered me a lap dance. After the first, she said lets do it again, but then she started to kiss me. They weren't deep kisses or anything, but a few times she bit my lip quite hard to where it actually hurt and I had to say stop. I remember waking up in the morning and seeing a tiny cut on the top of my lip from where she bit and it had me worried. I didn't know this girl at all, and since it was dark, I don't know the status of her mouth. Worst case scenario, if she was HIV+ and she had a bloody lip herself, and it touched my newly formed bloody lip, could I have contracted HIV? I know kissing isn't a way to get HIV, but if it was blood to blood on the lips, is there a possibility? The cut was very small, and within 48 hours had already completely healed up. I appreciate any feedback on this.

Answer: 

Hi there, and thanks a lot for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline for you HIV/AIDS related health information.

It sounds like you are concerned about your risk of HIV transmission.

The situation that you have described is a No Risk situation. Here are some of the reasons why:

  • HIV needs a human host to survive. Once HIV is outside of the body and exposed to oxygen it can no longer transmit. Any blood on her lips would have been outside of the body, exposed to oxygen and therefore would not transmit HIV to you.

  • Saliva has an enzyme that inhibits the transmission of HIV. Any blood in your mouth or on your lips would have come into contact with saliva containing this enzyme.

  • HIV needs direct access to your bloodstream in order to transmit. There was no direct access to your bloodstream. Superficial cuts, such as the small cut on your lip, simply do not provide the conditions necessary for transmission to occur. For superficial cuts to potential provide direct access to the bloodstream, they would have to be actively bleeding and in need of stitches or surgery to repair. From what I understand, this was not the case in your situation whereas the cut healed on it's own in 48 hours.

I would encourage you to check out the following resources about HIV:

Thank you for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline.

Hilary

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online

helpline.aidsvancouver.org