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Negative but high risk and red flag symptoms

Question: 

Please help me !
Two years ago 2017 (april - may) I had four times short unprotected intercourse with a women who died after 2 months due to AIDS. After knowing she was dead due to TB and AIDS I tested in immunochromatography (2 months), result was non-reactive. Again tested on 5 months (same test), result was unchanged. After more than a year 2018 october I tested on Alere 3rd gen rapid test at home. Result was negative. But now today 2019 august 28, I am infected with flu or common cold which has became very common after that threatening event. The thing that is haunting me is that I have developed small thrush at the corner of the left lip and I can gurantee it. I have also the fear of developing pneumonia due to the frequent resperitory infection. And last, one month ago I developed warts on penis meatus.
My question is that should I go for checkup and testing. Or should I wait for recovery of myself of both infection. Anexity has striked me again with the thrush.
Waiting for your suggestion.

Answer: 

Hi there,

Thank you for your inquiry. From what we gather from the question, you were asking about your symptoms (thrush, frequent respiratory infections, flu and common cold) in relation to a series of High Risk sexual encounters with a person living with HIV two years ago (2017).

Official HIV testing guidelines recommend re-testing at approximately 12 weeks post exposure. From what you have described, you received two tests after the 12 week recommended period (5 months & 1 year) post exposure. The 3rd Generation rapid testing method has an extremely high accuracy rate and is able to detect HIV with 99.6% accuracy (1). Any problems with this from of testing present in false positives, which are also extremely rare.

Although some of the symptoms you have described you are experiencing have been known to be related to the acute HIV transmission phase, there is no way to attribute these symptoms to HIV acquisition without adequate HIV testing confirmation.

Because you have previously tested negative a number of times, and assuming that you have not had any encounters that would warrant HIV risk since the one you have described, you may consider yourself to be HIV negative. However, if you are feeling anxious about your status, it is always a good idea to seek additional testing to confirm your HIV status. It is also always responsible to know your status. The CDC recommends that HIV testing be done at least once annually and more frequently for those involved in High, Low, or Negligible Risk activities (2).

Recommendation: No need for HIV testing, please seek out health care provider for additional testing if you feel necessary.

All the best,

AIDS Vancouver Online/Helpline, Cody