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Oral encounter and afraid

Question: 

I had an encounter where I got oral sex performed on my scrotum. After about 20 minutes she tried to put my penis in her mouth. Before the encounter I shaved and had a small cut between the base of my penis and the scrotum. Some saliva may have gotten on it. She moved up to put my penis in her mouth and it was literally there for only 2 seconds then I put on a condom and we continued for maybe 2 minutes. What are the chances of STDs or HIV transmission? I am really concerned. What testing should I get done and possibly how long should I wait. To be on the safe side I took some Amoxicillin because I have been feeling weird since. I have been feeling tired, fatigue, headaches or migraines. I haven't had any rashes, discharge or itchy/burning feelings. Thanks!

Answer: 

Hello and thank you for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline. We are happy to help!

Receiving oral sex is considered a negligible risk for HIV transmission. This means that in over 30 million cases of HIV worldwide, none have been confirmed to have come from receiving oral sex. This is for a few reasons. First, the HIV virus cannot survive outside of the human body once it has been exposed to air, so even if your partner's bodily fluid was on your penis, this would be no risk for you. Secondly, saliva actually works to stop the transmission of HIV. Since there is typically saliva present during oral sex, this greatly reduces the risk of any transmission. You do not require testing for this activity. However, we do recommend HIV testing to all people who are sexually active to maintain optimal health. Many people choose to incorporate HIV tests into their normal check-ups with their doctor.

As for your symptoms, they cannot be used as an indication of your status. This is because some people show them, others do not, and they often get confused with other illnesses like the flu. For this reason, the only way to know one's HIV status is to get tested.

In regard to STI transmission, we suggest seeking other trusted resources for information. Here at the Helpline, we are only trained in HIV-related information and therefore cannot comment on STI risk. You can visit these websites as a starting point for more information:

www.smartsexresource.com

www.catie.ca

Best,

Caroline

AIDS Vancouver Online/Helpline Volunteer

www.helpline.aidsvancouver.org

Private & confidential