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Oral msm risk

Question: 

Good day dears,

First of all, let me say that I'm slowly dying since I gave oral sex to another gay guy 3 months ago.
In the meantime, I've been constantly reading and exploring about my possible HIV exposure.

At the moment of the exposure, no blood noticed in my mouth, only odor coming from my wisdom crowns. I have crowns all aroung the mouth, excluding the front teeth (up and down).

I may have gingivitis, which isn't something blood-related, only one spot of gingiva looks reddish.

Okay, I don't know what to say, since I'm so anxious I can't breath. I want to go get tested but I'm so scared, since I experienced sore throat with no fever (maybe 37.2 Celsius one day) but I was constantly feeling hot, thinking this is ARS related. I was so scared, searching for symptoms and maybe anxiety made them show up.

There was not ejaculation in my mouth, but there must have been pre-ejaculation...

I'm constantly reading your forum and I must say that you all are giving a lot of good informations, this is a perfect place to ask! Thank YOU all !

So... Is gingivitis considered an open wound? Gingiva bleeding but not too much? Or what are you talking about is a big, open, gaping wound inside the mouth for a chance of transmition? I'm confused, scared to death. I can't sleep, eat, talk... My life became a big, deep, dark hole.

Answer: 

Hello,

Thank you for your inquiry. From what we gather from the question, you were asking about the risk of acquiring HIV through giving oral sex without a barrier. From the information given, this scenario is determined to be Low Risk (Evidence of transmission occurs through these activities when certain conditions are met).

The scenario mentioned above does meet the three components of the Transmission Equation. Performing oral sex without a barrier is considered a risky activity as it may allow HIV-containing fluid, such as pre-ejaculate, direct access to the blood-stream (1). Open sores, cuts, abrasions, or bleeding gum diseases such as gingivitis in the mouth can allow HIV direct access to the bloodstream (2).

Recommendation: Refer to a physician for an HIV test.

Regards,

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online, Marie