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Oral sex and semen on eye, rash 9 days later.

Question: 

I had a sexual encounter with a 70 yo gay male, although he said he was clean I know I should trust nobody, there was no actual penetration although I did rub my penis over his anus, I also performed oral sex to him but he didn't cum into my mouth but there was some pre cum as far I can remember, so around 5 seconds later he ejaculated, he put his genitals on my face and there was still some semen on his penis that rubbed my eye. Considering all these sexual activities, what's the risk of contracting HIV? Should I get worried? I'm actually worried now because 9 days later after the sex I'm getting a rash on my feet, thinking could be athlete's foot but now with the sexual encounter I had, I'm freaking out could be something else, as rashes are common symptoms for HIV . Last question, when is the best time to get tested? Should I wait a couple of months? Thank you very much.

Answer: 

Hello there,

Thank you for your inquiry. From what we gather from the question, you were asking about your risk of HIV acquisition through performing oral sex without a barrier.

From the information given, this scenario is determined to be Low Risk: (Evidence of transmission occurs through these activities when certain conditions are met). Although you had received semen to the eye, this poses the same risk as performing oral sex. There is a technical risk of acquiring HIV through receiving ejaculate to the eye, yet exposure to oxygen outside of the body would significantly reduce the concentration of HIV (1). For this reason alone, there is no additional risk involved in receiving semen to the eye than that of performing oral sex without a barrier.

Additionally, please consider that it is nearly impossible to attribute any/all physical symptoms to HIV without adequate HIV testing confirmation.

Most people develop detectable antibodies in 21-25 days post exposure. Yet, you may want to consider biomedical approaches such as PrEP and PEP that help lower your risk of acquiring HIV. If you have had an exposure, and feel as though it is one of high risk, PEP is a viable option for up to 72 hours in protecting yourself from HIV acquisition.

The P24 Antigen test is the most commonly used test within the first few weeks post exposure. It is recommended that you receive testing within this window period, in order to reduce any likelihood of transmission to other partners. For completely conclusive results, most HIV specialists recommend re-testing at 12 weeks post exposure.

Recommendation: Refer to Physician for HIV test.

All the best, AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online, Cody