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panic after Commercial Sex Trade Worker gave me oral

Question: 

Hi, last month i was engaged in sex with a call girl. she sucked my penis three timesand for less then one minute or few seconds each time. then i put on a condom and then she again sucked my penis. then i just licked her nipple, no sucking and no milking. then we had french kiss for three to four seconds. then with the condom intact on my penis i rubbed on her vagina. when i was trying to insert i cam. there was no breakage or slip of condom. then i went to bathroom for washing my organ with soap on my hand, and i realized that i was having a small cut on my finger, with soap leather it came in contact to my penis. I had many test previous to this act for donation of blood and i am HIV Negative. Now I am in panic and living with stress. what should i do? Please suggest me.

Answer: 

Hi there, and thanks a lot for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline for you HIV/AIDS related health information.

It sounds like you are concerned about your risk of HIV transmission.

First of all, Commercial Sex Trade Workers are no more likely than anyone else to be HIV positive. For this reason, on this forum we focus on the activities performed and not the individuals involved in the activities.

From what I understand you did not engage in vaginal intercourse, you just touched her vagina with your protected penis. The risk rating of your scenario is Negligible Risk because receiving oral sex is considered a Negligible Risk activity. This means that it can present a potential for HIV transmission because it can involve the exchange of body fluids. However, there has never been a confirmed report. Here are some reasons why your situation is Negligible Risk:

  • HIV needs a human host to survive. Once HIV is outside of the body and exposed to oxygen it can no longer transmit. This means that any HIV in your soap lather was outside the human body, exposed to oxygen and thus could not transmit HIV to you.

  • Licking Nipples and kissing are No Risk activities.

  • Saliva has an enzyme that inhibits the transmission of HIV.

  • HIV needs direct access to your bloodstream in order to transmit. There was no direct access to your bloodstream. Superficial cuts, such as the one on your hands, simply do not provide the conditions necessary for transmission to occur. For superficial cuts to potential provide direct access to the bloodstream, they would have to be actively bleeding and in need of stitches or surgery to repair. From what I understand, this was not the case in your situation.

Here at AIDS Vancouver we encourage everyone to make HIV testing a part of their regular health care maintenance routine. The only way to know your status is to be tested.

I would encourage you to check out the following resources about HIV:

Thank you for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline.

Hilary

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online

helpline.aidsvancouver.org