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Please answer me! Am I at risk for hiv?

Question: 

Hi,
I sent a question in recently but noticed it was not answered and I was hoping someone could please answer my question. I am worried about a bottle of lubricant I have that I am scared someone contaminated. I am worried that someone may have used a needle that is used for injecting (filled it up with bodily fluids, blood or sperm) and injected into my lubricant bottle. Then when I had sex my boyfriend used some lube and placed it on his penis and then in my vagina and I am worried that if someone did contaminate my lubricant by injecting bodily fluids in it, could hiv live in the bottle of lubricant and then infect me the way that I described? The person that I am worried about used to be a drug user and alcoholic and they were at my house as a guest and now I am worried for some reason that they went into my room and found my lubricant and injected something into it. I don't know why I am thinking like that probably because I am being irrational but I was wondering if that is a way of transmission and if this is something I need to be worried about? I am also worried that they touched my insulin needles that I use to inject insulin in my cat and am worried they did something to them. I accidentally poked myself prior to injecting insulin into my cat with one of my (new needles) that I am worried what if this person contaminated my needles.. They do have access to needles because they use them on their own diabetic cat and of course they were a drug user. Anyway do I need to be worried now about hiv or am I sounding irrational? Please tell me the truth. Can you catch hiv in any of the scenarios I asked and do you think I need to throw away the bottle of lube now and should not use it? Keep in mind this person as far as I know did not go into my room and opening up drawers to find this bottle of lube that I know of but for some reason my mind is worried that they did this. Please let me know if I am at risk? Can hiv live in bottles of lube that have a cap? Do you think I need to be worried that they found my cats insulin needles and started poking themselves with them or injecting bodily fluids into them with the hope that I accidentally poke myself or do I sound really irrational? I never saw them going through any of my stuff including touching my cats insulin needles that I actually hid because I knew they were coming over and I just forgot to hide the lube bottle but that was away in my room in a drawer but I did not see them or anyone go upstairs. Please answer me as soon as possible! Am I at risk, should I throw away my lube, do you think my cats insulin needles are contaminated? Sorry for the questions I am really stressed out.

Answer: 

Hello,

Thank you for your inquiry. From what we gather from the question, you were asking about acquiring HIV from a contaminated bottle of lubricant and possible contamination of insulin needles. From the information given, this scenario is determined to be No Risk (transmission of HIV is not possible in the given scenario).

The scenario mentioned above does not meet the three components of the transmission equation. The three components needed to satisfy the equation include : an exchange of bodily fluid through a high risk activity with direct access to the bloodstream (1). In the scenario of the lubricant bottle it is important to consider this quote from CDC "HIV does not survive long outside the human body (such as on surfaces), and it cannot reproduce outside a human host" (2). Please consider that HIV outside of the body or drying HIV causes a rapid (within several hours) 1-2 log (90%-99%) reduction in HIV concentration (2). This would suggest that outside the body HIV quickly becomes inactive. Although the virus can survive over 40 days in a completely sealed environment (i.e syringe) in this case a needle never came into contact with the individual therefore it can implied that the virus has become inactive at this point by the transfer of injecting into a bottle (2). There is no high risk activity with the lubricant bottle therefore the equation is not satisfied. For peace of mind getting rid of the bottle is an option.

In regards to the possible contamination of the cat insulin needles please consider again the fact that the HIV virus can survive over 40 days in a completely sealed environment (i.e syringe)(2). In this case it is noted that you were using a new needle. If the needle that pricked you was a new and sealed needle there is no risk of HIV infection.

Recommendation: No need for HIV test with the scenario provided, refer to a physician for other health related questions.

Regards,

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online, Danielle