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please help , i do not wanna commit suicide

Question: 

please help
I went to get tested in a lab , Soon after test I have become overwhelmed with the anxiety of getting infected from contaminated gloves! The lady who tested , used new gloves cleaned the area from where the blood was to be drawn with a alcohol swab , the blood was drawn everything is fine till here , but she kept the sealed alcohol swabs in the same tray , she had kept for the previous patient, she opened the swabs and used while removing the needle , and rest is under

Here are my assumptions:
* the previous persons small amount of blood (possibly while drawing the sample.) and the blood is infected would be on the tray in which the swabs were kept .
* The blood was wiped off or remained so little to notice, but there were some viruses left over on the gloves (No visible blood or fluid on the gloves, though i did not observe thoroughly)
she picked a new piece of alcohol swab with those contaminated gloves to wipe and afterwards to block the blood from flowing out after withdrawing the needles)

* Here are my questions: * What is the likelihood of getting infected this way? Can you say that the possibility is nil? No test is needed?
* Can viruses in dried and invisible form (I assume)pass on from the gloves onto the brand-new alcohol swab and then to the outlet where my blood was drawn? or Directly to blood
* Is one minute long enough for viruses to die, given invisible state with room temperature? * Can alcohol swab I dont know what types, immediately kill HIV , hepatitis A,B,C or any other virus upon contact? If not, how long? * If the viruses were alive, would it be sufficient in terms of quantity to infect me through the wound? Again, I simply just didnt see any visible stain of blood or fluid on the gloves at all.
* Does pressing and holding alcohol swab that carrying some virus on the wound for kill the virus or allow viruses to get into my bloodstream? (The way most doctors here usually do after every blood drawing to block the flowing). Bec while removing needle there was some blood on the alcohol swab may be 10 to 15 drops of blood i am worried because gloves touched the blood ,the blood that was coming out once nurse removed the syringe can i get infected this way I am desperately in need of the answer requesting to please reply once

the issue right now is i am in depression and having continuous suicidal thoughts ,
why because i have not committed a sin but still i do not wanna die with this disease

please just one last time answer

if gloves have touched any virus on that tray is it possible that virus could infect me as the gloves touched the blood while removing syringe and blocking the blood with alcohol swab .

i wish i could share the tears in my eyes right now .

please for the GOD's sake reply for last time
i know u must be thinking i am mad but i m in depression and i may commit suicide

Answer: 

Hello, Thank you for your inquiry. From what we gather from the question, you were asking about your risk of acquiring HIV from the tools used while having your blood drawn (alcohol swab, gloves, steel tray). From the information given, this scenario is determined to be No Risk (transmission of HIV is not possible in the given scenario).

The scenario mentioned above does not meet the three components of the transmission equation(1). It does not satisfy the equation because:

  • For transmission to occur the three components of the HIV Transmission Equation must be met: there must be HIV present in a bodily fluid (ie: in blood, semen or rectal secretions), direct access to the bloodstream (ie: inside of the vagina, anus and other mucous membranes) paired with a high risk activity (ie: unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse, sharing needles, mother to child)(1).

  • HIV does not survive long outside the human body (such as on surfaces), and it cannot reproduce outside a human host(2&3).

  • There must be direct access to the bloodstream.

Let's answer your questions 1 by 1:

1. "What is the likelihood of getting infected this way? Can you say that the possibility is nil? No test is needed?"

This is determined to be a No Risk scenario, meaning that you cannot acquire HIV in the scenario that you have described. You cannot acquire HIV from the alcohol patch used on you when the needle was removed. You cannot acquire HIV from the glove used. You cannot acquire HIV from the alcohol patch. You cannot acquire HIV from the steel tray on which the pads were kept. This is because HIV is not transmitted by objects. For transmission to occur the three components of the HIV Transmission Equation must be met: there must be HIV present in a bodily fluid (ie: in blood, semen or rectal secretions), direct access to the bloodstream (ie: inside of the vagina, anus and other mucous membranes) paired with a high risk activity (ie: unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse, sharing needles, mother to child)(1). In your scenario, there was no bodily fluid from another patient that you could see, there was no direct access to your bloodstream, and there was no risky activity. You do not need an HIV test in this scenario.

2. "Can viruses in dried and invisible form (I assume)pass on from the gloves onto the brand-new alcohol swab and then to the outlet where my blood was drawn? or Directly to blood"

This is determined to be a No Risk scenario, meaning that you cannot acquire HIV in the scenario that you have described. You cannot acquire HIV by touching an object or by an object touching you. HIV cannot be transmitted by dried or invisible blood on the gloves or an alcohol swab touching the site of the blood draw. HIV does not survive long outside the human body (such as on gloves or alcohol swabs), and it cannot reproduce outside a human host(2). Any dried or invisible blood would have been outside of the human body, exposed to environmental conditions and thus, not able to transmit to you. There was no direct access for HIV to enter your bloodstream, a needle prick from a blood draw does not provide direct access to your bloodstream. Some methods of direct access to the bloodstream are inside of the vagina, inside of the anus and other mucous membranes, and not a needle prick from a blood draw. You have described a No Risk scenario, meaning that you cannot acquire HIV in the scenario that you have described.

3. "Is one minute long enough for viruses to die, given invisible state with room temperature? * Can alcohol swab I dont know what types, immediately kill HIV , hepatitis A,B,C or any other virus upon contact? If not, how long? * If the viruses were alive, would it be sufficient in terms of quantity to infect me through the wound? Again, I simply just didnt see any visible stain of blood or fluid on the gloves at all."

This is determined to be a No Risk scenario, meaning that you cannot acquire HIV in the scenario that you have described. HIV does not survive long outside the human body (such as on surfaces), and it cannot reproduce outside a human host(2&3). "Studies performed at CDC have also shown that drying HIV causes a rapid (within several hours) 1-2 log (90%-99%) reduction in HIV concentration."(3). This means that, "HIV does not survive long outside the human body (such as on surfaces), and it cannot reproduce outside a human host. HIV outside of the body undergoes a rapid decline in concentration, and is quickly rendered inactive on outside surfaces such as medical equipment like trays, swabs, and gloves. There is not much evidence to suggest timing of HIV survival outside of the body as variables involved can vary drastically. However in this case, we would assume that fluid has been exposed to the environment for a lengthy amount of time."(4) On this forum we assess the risk HIV transmission, for complete and accurate information regarding Hepatitis we would refer you to a website called CATIE.

4. "Does pressing and holding alcohol swab that carrying some virus on the wound for kill the virus or allow viruses to get into my bloodstream?"

This is determined to be a No Risk scenario, meaning that you cannot acquire HIV in the scenario that you have described. You cannot acquire HIV by touching an object or by an object touching you. Pressing and holding an alcohol swab with potential bodily fluid on it, does not provide the conditions necessary for you to acquire HIV. HIV does not survive long outside the human body (such as on alcohol swabs), and it cannot reproduce outside a human host(2&3&4). There was no direct access for HIV to enter your bloodstream, a needle prick from a blood draw does not provide direct access to your bloodstream. You have described a No Risk scenario, meaning that you cannot acquire HIV in the scenario that you have described.

The scenario that you have described has been assessed as No Risk, meaning that you cannot acquire HIV in the scenario that you have described.

If you are still concerned or feeling distressed regarding this situation after having read the information provided, we would strongly encourage you to reach out to a healthcare professional or emergency services in your area. Emergency services have healthcare professionals on staff who are ready and able to help at times of distress.

Recommendation: Reach out to your healthcare professional or emergency services in your area if you feeling distressed in any way. No need for HIV test with the scenario provided, refer to the resources we have linked below to learn more about HIV and HIV transmission.

Regards, AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online, Hilary