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Please help me! Qn on shared makeup and handshake

Question: 

Hi,

Today I went for an event as a fashion model. The hair stylists and make up artists were both HIV positive. I knew that because they chatted with me about it. So they both did my hair and makeup. The things that worry me was that the guy touched and fondled ard with my hair and scalp and also touched my face. The makeup artist used the same makeup kit that she used for herself on me. I saw her use it. She used the exact same brushes, lipstick etc, which she has used on many other people before without cleaning. Is there a HIV risk if she has gotten any blood on the brushes and she used it on my face? My face has a few pimples and acne.. It is red and swollen. Is there any risk? Is there any risk with shared makeup (especially lips makeup since it touches the mouth) with HIV positive people? I also shook hands with them and I realise there is some peeled skin on my hands. What are the chances of HIV if their blood touched my peeled skin? Is it of high risk?

Please help me

Answer: 

Hello and thank you for using AIDS Vancouver as your source for HIV/AIDS related information,

In order for HIV transmission to occur, body fluids with high levels of HIV such as blood, semen/pre-cum, anal/vaginal fluids, and breast milk must have direct access into the blood stream of someone who is HIV negative. Examples of areas that have direct access to the blood stream are the vagina/penis urethra, anus, other mucosal membranes, points of needle injection, and open cuts and sores. Two activities with high risk exposure are unprotected vaginal/anal sex and the sharing of needles. High risk activities are activities that involve the exchange of body fluids and have been demonstrated through research and reporting that have been strongly associated with HIV transmission; there are many confirmed reports of HIV transmission through these activities. It is also important to note that HIV is a very fragile virus meaning that in a very short time of exposure to air the virus is destroyed and therefore unable to transmit to another person.

Regarding the re-use of make up tools, given that HIV has an extremely short lifespan outside of the body and that there was no direct access to the blood stream there is no risk for acquiring HIV from this activity. There is no risk of transmission related to pimples and acne as they are not direct points of entry into the blood stream. Only deep and exposed cuts and wounds would be an area of concern. With lipstick, saliva is not a body fluid that carries a high level of HIV. It is also important to know that saliva actually inhibits HIV. There is no risk associated with the re-use of lipstick. Shaking hands with an HIV positive person also does not carry any risk for transmission of HIV as there are no body fluids present that carry high levels of HIV or direct points of access into the blood stream (peeling skin is not a direct access point to the blood stream). If there was blood present on the hand it would have been destroyed within seconds and therefore unable to transmit HIV. Overall, there is no risk of transmission for HIV in any of these activities.

For further information regarding transmission of HIV or any other questions you might have, you can look at our forum on AIDS Vancouver

In Health, Johannah AIDS Vancouver