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Sex with shemale

Question: 

Sex with shemale i'm 28 year male I had a sexual exposure with a commercial transgender who is on hormones, we had sex on june9th2015 at 9 pm we had oral sex (unprotected) and anal sex(protected) to each other while she penetrated me she used two condoms due to lack of knowledge.but when I penetrated her I used one condome. we had sex for a 20 min. after I came home I realised I did some mistake with going with a commercial transgender sex worker so I asked to get her tested she got herself tested on june11th by trident method she got hiv negative, immediately I went to local doctor on june 12th evening he told me to get my self tested with PCR DNA and Elisa I gave blood sample at 70th hour after exposure.Mean while he suggested to start with PEP medication I started taking PEP from 71st hour after exposure. Result came june18th evening both by Elisa and PCR test I got negative. doctor told there no worry you can stop taking PEP its been 12days since i started taking PEP before stopping i thought to take second opinion from you please give needful suggestion.

Answer: 

Hello and thank you for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline.

We are happy to answer your questions and provide some more information to help you decide how to proceed.

We want to let you know that the activities involved in your exposure are unlikely to transmit HIV when risk factors (e.g. broken condom, an untreated STI) are not present:

  • Receiving oral sex (unprotected) is associated with a negligible-risk of acquiring HIV in British Columbia
  • There have been no reports of HIV being acquired from this activity in BC.
  • During this activity, body fluids and the urethra (in the penis) are exposed to the air.
  • Since HIV cannot reproduce itself outside of the human body, acquiring HIV from receiving oral sex is unlikely if you are not living with an untreated STI.

  • Giving oral sex (unprotected) is associated with a low-risk of acquiring HIV in British Columbia when risk factors (e.g. an untreated STI) are present.

  • There have only been a few reports of HIV being acquired from this activity in British Columbia.
  • When risk factors are not present, it is unlikely to acquire HIV from this activity since body fluids in the mouth are exposed to the air, saliva contains a substance (enzyme) that helps stop HIV transmission from happening, and, the mouth/throat/stomach do not usually provide direct access to the bloodstream.

  • Sexual intercourse (with condom) is associated with a low-risk of acquiring HIV in British Columbia when a condom breaks, or when an untreated STI is present.

  • A condom is the most reliable way to prevent the exchange of body fluids that is required for HIV transmission to happen; therefore, when risk factors (e.g. broken condom, an untreated STI) are not present, there is no risk of acquiring HIV from sexual intercourse (with condom).

If your exposure happened on June 9th, and you carried out an NAAT HIV, and an antibody test on June 12, it is still too early to tell if you have acquired HIV from this particular exposure. However, the results of this HIV test does tell us that you have not acquired HIV prior to the last 3 months, and this is good.

You started P.E.P. treatment within 72 hours post-exposure, and this is known to greatly reduce the risk of HIV transmission happening when P.E.P is consumed for 28 days.

P.E.P. treatment may affect the window period of an HIV test, and it is suggested that individuals wait 3 months AFTER they have finished P.E.P. treatment to carry out an HIV test for the most accurate results. If you choose to end P.E.P. treatment earlier, we may still suggest waiting 3 months after the point that you end treatment to achieve reliable HIV test results.

P.E.P. treatment happens for 28 days, and then, the period for testing is 84 days. A total of 110 days post-exposure is suggested to achieve conclusive HIV test results while carrying out P.E.P. treatment fully.

We hope this helps clarify that although it is very unlikely for an individual to acquire HIV from the exposure you have described, continuing P.E.P treatment for 28 days is known to be the most reliable way to prevent HIV transmission from happening after an exposure.

Sincerely,

Marta

AIDS Vancouver Volunteer

AIDS Vancouver Online Helpline

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1-604-253-0566 ext 299

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