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Difference Between Insertive and Receptive Oral Sex

Question: 

Hi.Someone sucked my penis few months back. I don't know his HIV Status. What are my risk of HIV?Understand from you guys that receptive oral sex has negligible risk of HIV. What about my case?What is the difference between Insertive and Receptive Oral Sex

Answer: 

Hi there,
 
Thank you for using the AIDS Vancouver Online Helpline as your source of HIV/AIDS related information.
 
Receiving oral sex is considered having a negligible risk of contracting HIV, but no actual cases have been reported. By saying negligible, I mean acquiring HIV through receiving oral six is only theoretically possible because an exchange of body fluids is certainly involved. However, saliva is actually a fluid that cannot pass HIV to another person. 
 
Insertive oral sex is not a term we use. We usually say "giving" or "receiving" oral sex. In terms of "insertive sex", this usually refers to anal or vaginal sex, not oral sex. If you insert your genitals into the vagina or anus of another person then you would be insertive partner in this scenario.
 
If someone inserts their genitals into your mouth, this would be considered giving oral sex, which is low risk for transmission. HIV transmission is unlikely but testing is the only way to know your status for sure.
 
If you insert your genitals into someone elses mouth, this would be what we call "receiving oral sex": your partner performs oral sex on you. This activity has a negligible risk as explained before.By saying negligible, I mean that while a theoretical case for a risk of transmission can be made, there have been no cases of transmission directly attributed to such a scenario.
 
In both giving and receiving oral sex, saliva may reduce the risk because this body fluid has an enzyme that deactivates the virus. In addition, after being deactivated by your saliva, the virus is then swallowed to your digestive track and killed by the very acidic stomach fluid. HIV fails to go into your bloodstream through giving oral sex. 
 
I hope I have addressed your concerns. Please feel free to write us back if you have additional HIV/AIDS related questions. 
 
In Health,
Tina 
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer 
E-mail: helpline@aidsvancouver.org 
Phone (Mon-Fri 9-4pm): (604) 696-4666
Web: www.aidsvancouver.org/helpline