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what is the possibility of HIV infection?

Question: 

Thanks for your service. I want to know , what is the possibility of getting HIV infection from the following1. rubbing bodies together2. kissing on the skin by CSW, no oral inserting,3 rubbing penis against the body of CSW(Not touchung penis with vegina) and having unprotected sex between the boobs of CSW. 4. Rubbing the vegina of CSW with knee. no iinserting5. Touching and hugging the CSW please answer considering that the CSW is HIV positive. how ever exact status unknown

Answer: 

Hello and thank you for choosing the AIDS Vancouver Helpline as your source of HIV/AIDS related information.
All of the 5 scenarios you described are zero risk for the passing of HIV. Let me attempt to explain why using the HIV transmission equation. ALL of these three things (fluid, activity, and direct access to bloodstream) must be present in order for HIV transmission even to be possible.

HIV TRANSMISSION EQUATION
 
 

BODY FLUID WITH HIGH LEVELS OF HIV

 

ACTIVITY

 

DIRECT ACCESS FOR THE VIRUS TO ENTER THE BLOODSTREAM

·         blood (including menstrual blood)
·         semen
·         pre-cum
·         rectal secretions
·         vaginal fluids
·         breast milk

+

·         unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse
·         sharing needles
·         mother to child

+

·         vagina
·         anus
·         urethra in the penis
·         open cuts and sores (in theory)
·         other mucosal membranes
·         points of needle injection

 

 

=

 

 

RISK OF HIV TRANSMISSION

I trust you can see that you did not engage in any high risk activities during your encounter with the sex worker. In addition, there was no direct access to the bloodstream for the virus (if even present) to enter. You rubbed your penis only on her skin, and her vagina only on your knee. The HIV virus cannot enter unbroken skin. 
I just want to note that sex workers are no more likely than anyone else to be HIV+. It is the risky activities that someone engages in, not their occupation, race, sex, socioeconomic status, etc. that makes them more likely to be HIV+. In fact, sex workers, on average, get tested more frequently for STIs and use condoms during intercourse more often than the general population. 
Although I do not recommend testing based on this encounter alone, we do recommend regular STI testing to everyone who is sexually active. On an individual basis, this could be annually, biannully, or every few months. 
Thank you for your question and please feel free to write back if you have any more concerns. 
Best Wishes,
Elyse
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer
E-mail: helpline@aidsvancouver.org
Phone (Mon-Fri 9am-4pm): (604) 696-4666
Web: www.aidsvancouver.org/helpline