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Would I be infected with HIV from a handjob with vaginal fluids and massage oil?

Question: 

 
Hello there. I am extremely worried that I have contracted HIV. Please assess my risk factors according to my scenario.
 
I recently visited a massage parlor in Auckland (First & only time) and received an unprotected handjob from a lady. I was naked and the lady was naked as well. Apart from the handjob for 30 minutes, nothing else happened. She had fingered herself for sometime and probably had some vaginal fluids on her hand when she was performing the handjob on me. There must have been a time gap of 15-30 seconds between her fingering herself and her performing the handjob on me. She also used some body oil for the handjob. I am afraid that the oil might have some surviving HIV and I might have contracted it through the oil massage on my penis. Now, please help me assess my risk factors, in case the parlor lady is indeed HIV positive,
 
1) Would I be infected with HIV when she performed a handjob on me while she had her vaginal fluids on her hand?
 
2) If the oil had HIV from previous customers, would I be infected as well through the handjob?
 
3) Should I get tested for HIV?
 
4) There was no vaginal sex, anal sex or oral sex involved. It was only a handjob mentioned in the current scenario. Is it even possible to get HIV through hand jobs? (She had not cuts on her and even I didn't have any cuts on me.)
 
Please let me know if I am at a risk. I haven't had any sleep since the incident (Which happened almost a week ago) and my health is going down the drain thanks to my anxiety. I am pretty sure now, that I will never go ahead with such moments again. Waiting for you reply. :'(
 
John

Answer: 

Hi John,
Thank you for using the AIDS Vancouver Online Helpline as your source of HIV/AIDS related information.
First of all, I would like to mention that HIV does not discriminate based on age, gender, occupation, sexual orientation, etc. Just because the lady working in a massage parlor, this does not necessarily make her at higher risk for having HIV. It is the activities that one performs (such as unprotected anal or vaginal sex or sharing needles) that pose a risk for HIV transmission, not the person themselves. I will answer your questions below:
To help you understand HIV transmission, these three factors must all exist for a risk of HIV transmission to occur:1. The presence of an HIV containing fluid (such as blood or sexual secretion),2. A risky activity (such as unprotected vaginal or anal sex or sharing needles for drug use),3. Direct access to the blood stream (such as the vagina, anus, urethra of the penis, or through points of needle injection).
All three of these factors must be present for a risk of transmission to exist. Please  make note of these to assess situations in the future.
1) Fingering, mutual masturbation, or hand jobs are considered activities of negligible risk. This means that although HIV transmission is theoretically possible, there have never been any cases reported where this has happened. Even if she had vaginal fluids on her hand and she was HIV+, the HIV virus is very fragile and cannot live outside of the body for long (it dies in a matter of seconds once exposed to air). Additionally, giving a handjob does not allow her fluids to have direct access to your urthera. For this reason, only penetrative sex (unprotected) poses a high risk for transmission of HIV. Therefore, the virus would likely have been dead before it came into close to your urethra.
2) Because the HIV virus dies in a matter of seconds once it is outside the body, there is no way that it could have lived in the massage oil. Therefore, there is no risk of transmission by coming in contact with the oil.
3) Based on the situations you have described, you do not need to get tested for HIV. However, because other STIs are more commonly transmitted, we do suggest regular testing for all STIs, including HIV, for all sexually active individuals. Based on your needs, testing can occur annually, biannually, or every 3-4 months.
4) As previously mentioned, the risk of transmission from hand jobs is only theoretical and testing is not necessary.
You can rest assured that you do not have HIV and should try to get past this incident. If you are continuing to feel anxiety and it is affecting your health, I would suggest seeing a health professional or therapist to ease your worries.
Please let us know if you have any other questions,
In Health,
AlyAIDS Vancouver Helpline VolunteerE-mail: helpline@aidsvancouver.orgPhone (Mon-Fri 9am-4pm): (604) 696-4666Web: www.aidsvancouver.org/helpline
 

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