Anonymous
Hello. First, I want to thank you in advance for your help.

Eleven days ago I had a meeting with a shemale sex worker where I was the insertive partner. It was no more than 1 minute of PROTECTED anal sex and I didn't ejaculate inside her, I have finished masturbating myself (with the same condom I have used in anal sex). We used based water lub and latex condom.

I'm sure the condom was intact because I ejaculated on it and my semen was inside.

Four days after sex, my throat started to hurt a bit more (it was already aching a little before sex) and then after two days my ear and head began to ache (the head hurts in the forehead). It also came a ulcer under my tongue.

The sore throat and ear pain stopped in two days, with the use of anti-inflammatory. But now they started again, but now it's the other ear that ache, and came another ulcer under my tongue.

Now I'm afraid it's ARS symptoms.

I would like to know if some of these situations had some risk:

1) The condom slipped a little, but not out of my penis. The head of the penis was always covered. It was a risk?

2) Mouth kiss. I had sore throat and have gingivitis, which sometimes bleeds. Not sure if it was bleeding a little at kiss moment. It was a risk?

3) I finished masturbating myself, but didn't remove the condom to ejaculate. In my hands and fingers had some anal secretion/fluids mixed with water lub (that was on condom). The problem is that I have hangnail active in almost all my hand fingers, which bleed easily when the skin is pulled, could it be a risk?

I was confident that had safe sex until I started to get sick.

Thankyou again.
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Anonymous
Hi there, and thanks a lot for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline for you HIV/AIDS related health information.

Let's answer your questions!


Question 1: "The condom slipped a little, but not out of my penis. The head of the penis was always covered. It was a risk?"

* Any protected anal sex is considered a Low Risk activity. This means that it presents a potential for HIV transmission because it can involve an exchange of body fluids. There have been a few reports of infection attributed to these activities (usually under certain identifiable conditions).




Question 2: "Mouth kiss. I had sore throat and have gingivitis, which sometimes bleeds. Not sure if it was bleeding a little at kiss moment. It was a risk?

* Kissing is a No Risk activity, even if your gums were bleeding a little bit. Saliva has an enzyme that inhibits the transmission of HIV.





Question 3: "I finished masturbating myself, but didn't remove the condom to ejaculate. In my hands and fingers had some anal secretion/fluids mixed with water lub (that was on condom). The problem is that I have hangnail active in almost all my hand fingers, which bleed easily when the skin is pulled, could it be a risk?"

* Superficial cuts on your hands are a Negligible Risk. This means that they can present a potential for HIV transmission because they do involve the exchange of body fluids. However, there has never been a confirmed report.

* HIV needs a human host to survive. Once HIV is outside of the body and exposed to oxygen it can no longer transmit.

* HIV needs direct access to your bloodstream in order to transmit. There was no direct access to your bloodstream. Superficial cuts simply do not provide the conditions necessary for transmission to occur. For superficial cuts to potential provide direct access to the bloodstream, they would have to be actively bleeding and in need of stitches or surgery to repair. From what I understand, this was not the case in your situation




HIV presents itself differently in different people, therefore we cannot comment on the symptoms that you have been experiencing. HIV is not diagnosed based on symptoms. I would, however, recommend that you contact your health care provider to discuss your symptoms and develop a treatment plan. Symptoms can be indicative of other viral infections.

Here at AIDS Vancouver we encourage everyone to make HIV testing a part of their regular health care maintenance routine. The only way to know your status is to be tested. When you visit your health care provider you can ask for an HIV test and know your status.


I would encourage you to check out the following resources about HIV:

  • Smart Sex Resource


  • HIV Basics


  • Risk Assessment Chart


  • Thank you for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline.

    Hilary


    AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online

    helpline.aidsvancouver.org
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