Anonymous
Hi i think i had a risk about 3 weeks ago. I received a lap dance in a sex shop, i was naked and so was the girl. My penis did not come into contact with her vagina or ass at all. She did however rub my penis between her tits which she informed me that the previous client had cummed on. She had however cleaned up and i could not feel any wetness on her tits. She had also wiped some of her cum on my leg. Is this a risk at all? I did a test at 16 days which was negative. Should I continue testing?My dr has said that a test would be prettyaccurate at 6 weeks if they test for both the anitgen and antibody.Is this true?

Please help me. I feel like I have every symptom possible that can relate to hiv. Dry throat, coughing i had the flu, tiredness ad fatigue
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Anonymous
Hi there,

Thanks for contacting AIDS Vancouver for HIV/AIDS-related information.

Based on your situation, you actually did NOT place yourself at risk for HIV transmission. Let me explain why.

For there to be a risk, body fluids containing HIV (ie. blood, semen, vaginal fluids) need direct access to YOUR bloodstream. This typically occurs when people have unprotected vaginal or anal sex, as the urethra, the vagina and the rectum can provide access. So, the lapdance is no risk because there was no exchange of body fluids, no access to your bloodstream and you did not participate in an activity that put you at risk.

So, why is it considered no risk for you to rub your penis between breasts, even if there was semen from someone else on them? This is because HIV is a relatively weak virus outside of the body. It dies within 60 seconds of exposure to oxygen. So by the time the sex worker finished with her previous client, the HIV potentially present (and we don't know for sure) in the semen would have died by the time your dance occurred. Same goes for the vaginal fluids of the worker. HIV transmission does not occur through skin-to-skin contact.

So, based on this event alone, I would not recommend testing since you did not place yourself at risk. However, if you would like to get an HIV test, the combo test (for antigens and antibodies) is very effective at 6 weeks. Most HIV specialists consider test results to be conclusive at this point. However, the global standard is still 12 weeks. This is not because the combination test is bad or inaccurate (it is very accurate and reliable), but just because there are places in the world that still do not have access to this test. Up to 95% of infections are detectable within 4-6 weeks. This is because most people who become HIV positive tend to develop detectable antibodies between 21-25 days.

As for your symptoms, please note that there are few clinically-defined symptoms. Things like dry throat, coughing, flu, fatigue- none of these are specific to HIV infection and could be related to many other things. If you continue to feel unwell, please visit a health care provider to rule out other possible health conditions.

I trust I've answered your questions. However, if you have others, please don't hesitate to ask us again.

All the best

Maggie

AIDS Vancouver Volunteer
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