Anonymous
I understand that HIV is a weak virus and cannot survive once exposed to air. However, what about airtight environments besides the human body or a syringe. From reading posts I know that you prefer not to deal with hypothetical situations but I would greatly appreciate if could answer the following questions:

If someone were to eat something by mistake that had fresh HIV positive blood on it I understand that saliva and stomach acid would kill the HIV virus. However, what if someone were on high does of antacid drugs where they have virtually no stomach acid could this be a possible route of HIV transmission as there would be no acid to kill the virus and would be inside our airtight body?

If someone went to a jewelry store and tried on a pair of earrings from an airtight jewelry showcase without cleaning the earrings with an alcohol wipe and the person who previously tried on the earrings was HIV positive and bled on the earrings. So would trying on the earrings that weren't cleaned and had hiv positive blood on them be a possible route of transmission if when you were trying them on you cut your ear say when taking out the earning backing?

Along the same lines if a razor was kept in an airtight container and there was HIV positive blood on the razor then if someone were to use the razor without cleaning it and cut themselves would they be at risk for HIV due to the airtight container which wouldn't have exposed the blood to air?
Quote
Anonymous
Hi there,

I understand you're concerned about hypothetical situations, but you're right that here at AIDS Vancouver we do not like to go by them as they're usually unplausible, and unlikely to ever occur. That being said, I will address your concerns.

Like you said, HIV cannot survive exposure to air. Although you used the word airtight, all three of your hypothetical situations actually involve HIV being exposed to air, and none of them have direct access to the bloodstream, so therefore none of them are a risk. The reason none of your situations are "airtight" is because to put the food in your mouth it has to access air, to take the earring/razor out of the case it has to access air, even if it was "airtight" to begin with. Keep in mind though that other infectious agents, such as Hepatitis C, can be exposed to air, so that is something to keep in mind with the earrings for example.

Hopefully this helped,
Sincerely, Christina

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online

Monday-Friday 10am-4pm PST

604 253 0566 Ext 299

Private and Confidential
Quote

ABOUT THE HELPLINE | SUPPORT OUR WORK | RISK ASSESSMENT CHART | ANONYMOUS TESTING | DISCLAIMER | CONTACT

Charitable Registration #
10668 9896 RR0001


© 2019 helpline.aidsvancouver.org
Privacy Policy
Disclaimer

OUR ADDRESS

1101 Seymour Street
Suite 235, 2nd Floor
Vancouver, BC V6B 0R1
Canada


GET IN TOUCH

Main Phone: 604-893-2201
Fax: 604-893-2205
Email: contact@aidsvancouver.org