Anonymous
I kissed a guy 1 month before.also I have given a suck to a guy and he out the cum in to my mouth.and put the cum in to dust bin.and I washed my mouth as well.I have a Wound in my mouth At that time. After one week my body is itching. Specially toung.I got fever one time After one week.also Sore throat.
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Anonymous
Hello and thank you for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline. We are pleased to assist you.

It sounds like none of the activities you have engaged in during your exposure would be considered high-risk for acquiring HIV, and here is why:

HIV TRANSMISSION EQUATION


For a risk of HIV transmission to exist, 3/3 parts must be present in an exposure:
BODY FLUID
+
ACTIVITY
+
DIRECT ACCESS TO BLOODSTREAM
---------- -------- ----------------------------
• blood (including menstrual) • unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse • vagina
• semen • sharing needles • anus
• pre-cum • mother to child (in specific cases) • urethra in the penis
• rectal secretions • open cuts and sores (in theory)
• vaginal fluids • other mucosal membranes
• breast milk • points of needle injection

In the exposure you have described, 2/3 parts are not present: direct access to the bloodstream AND a high-risk activity.

More specifically, kissing (with no blood present) is considered a no-risk activity and the enzymes in saliva (spit) help stop HIV transmission from happening. We noticed that you mentioned you had a wound in your mouth. However, most open cuts/sores/other mucous membranes that provide direct access to the bloodstream require professional medical treatment (e.g. stitches/surgery) right away, and it does not sound like the wound in your mouth was severe. Having said that, small wounds in the mouth (e.g. from brushing your teeth) do not provide direct access to the bloodstream and so kissing in the exposure you have described remains a no-risk activity.

Giving oral sex (a.k.a. giving suck to guy) is considered a low-risk activity for acquiring HIV. As you can see, the mouth is not listed as a body part that provides direct access to the bloodstream when bodily fluids are present. There have only been a few reports of HIV being acquired from this activity, which have occurred under certain identifiable circumstances (e.g. the presence of another STI) that may not apply to you. The fact that HIV cannot be passed on after exposure to the air, and that the enzymes in saliva help stop HIV transmission from happening reduces the level of risk associated with giving oral sex, and many other activities:http://helpline.aidsvancouver.org/question/risk-assessment-chart.

Symptoms cannot tell us whether or not an individual is living with HIV; only an HIV test can. We may suggest that you partner with a healthcare professional to address the symptoms you are experiencing. However, it seems unlikely that your symptoms are related to HIV since, HIV is not typically acquired from the activities you have described.

We have answered your questions to the best of our ability, and invite you to contact the AIDS Vancouver Helpline again in the future or call us (604) 253-0566 ext 299 for immediate assistance with general inquiries.

Sincerely,

Marta

AIDS Vancouver Volunteer
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