Anonymous
hello. please if my son (5 yrs) touched fresh blood drops and then he touched his eyes, nose, mouth, has some small cuts on hands can he be infected?
the situation happened as follows > it was just normal child in normal situation - having fun so walking on hands, he has normal small injuries as child of his age, small superficial cuts on hands, picking nose all the time, scratching eyes etc - i normally of course dont control his hands all the time if there is blood on them or no, ... but this time right after this i noticed red drops looking like fresh blood on the stairs right where my son did touch them and as he keeps touching his eyes and picking nose, i am a bit scared. it was in our apartment block and we have some not very "wellbehaved" neighbours and i am just anxious mother sometimes. thank you very much. one more thing: i am sure, although the blood looked like "fresh" it was at least two minutes old as I didnt see anybody bleeding, just that left blood. the drops were max of 1 cm in diameter, some max 10 of them.
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Anonymous
Hi there and thank you for contacting us at AIDS Vancouver, we are happy to help.

It sounds as though you are concerned about your 5 year old son coming into contact with blood and about his risk for HIV transmission. I can see how that would be very concerning for you as his mother, here is some information to help put your mind at ease.

In order for there to be a risk of HIV transmission, specific body fluids must come into DIRECT contact with the body fluids of someone with HIV, through specific activities. These are outlined below in the HIV transmission equation:


HIV TRANSMISSION EQUATION


BODY FLUID
+
ACTIVITY
+
DIRECT ACCESS TO BLOODSTREAM
---------- -------- ----------------------------
• blood (including menstrual) • unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse • vagina
• semen • sharing needles • anus
• pre-cum • mother to child (in specific cases) • urethra in the penis
• rectal secretions • open cuts and sores (in theory)
• vaginal fluids • other mucosal membranes
• breast milk • points of needle injection
Also, HIV relies on the body to survive, therefore as soon as it is exposed to air the virus will not transmit. In your case, the blood that was on the ground would not be able to transmit HIV since it was exposed to air.

Due to the fact that there was no direct access to the bloodstream and the HIV was non-transmittable, we would say that there was NO RISK of HIV transmission to your son.

Please note that this information is relevant to HIV only and not other infections. If you have any other questions or concerns regarding HIV, please do not hesitate to contact our helpline.

Open Monday to Friday
9am-4pm (PST)
604-253-0566 ext. 299
Private and confidential

Sincerely,

Raveena (volunteer)
AIDS Vancouver
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= RISK OF HIV TRANSMISSION