Anonymous
I'm concerned with a small cardboard/paper cut i had near the edge/under of my nail.

I had briefly touched the outside of a ladies vagina with lube for about 30 seconds.

The cut was not bleeding at the time and had already been a day old...its wasnt deep and stopped bleeding within 30-40 seconds when it happened the day before.

The next day i looked at the cut and started getting worried about hiv transmission.

I squeezed hard on the finger to see if the cut would bleed and a tiny amount of blood with white plasma came out but was more plasma and stopped straight after i stopped pressing on it.

I know that a wound has to be large like a knife wound and that sores heal from the inside out almost
Immediately after injury and it doesnt allow access to the blood stream and lastly there has never been a case of transmission in this way.

Also the virus is very weak and would die with the air...so i know i am
Being very paranoid and worried but I am a single father and think the worst with anxiety.

Should i be worried, do i need to get a hiv test?
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Anonymous
Hello and thank you for using AIDS Vancouver as your primary source of information about HIV/AIDS issues.

I am so glad to see you have been reading our website, and I would like to reassure you that you are at no risk of contracting HIV. For a risk of HIV to exist, specific HIV positive bodily fluids (vaginal/anal fluids, semen, blood,) must directly access the bloodstream of an HIV negative individual (e.g. unprotected sex, sharing needles). Also, you are correct about HIV being inhibited by air (oxygen). So, rubbing the outside of a woman's vagina for about 30 seconds with a cardboard/paper cut on your finger certainly does not put you at-risk of HIV infection; HIV cannot live on surfaces such as the exterior skin of an individual, and no exchange of bodily fluids had taken place in the situation you have described. An HIV test is not necessary for the situation you have described.

You should know that fingering as a sexual activity is a negligible risk for HIV infection, which means that while there is an exchange of bodily fluids there has never been a confirmed report of HIV infection attributed to this sexual activity. Continue to protect yourself against HIV and all STIs by engaging in safe sexual practises, and getting tested for HIV and all other STIs consistently as part of your overall health maintenance routine.

I trust I have answered your questions sufficiently. Feel free to write back to the AIDS Vancouver Helpline, or visit our website http://www.aidsvancouver.org for more information.

Sincerely,

Marta

AIDS Vancouver Volunteer



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