Anonymous
I just bought a meal from a restaurant this afternoon, and I was drinking my soda, I noticed that there was a red line across the rim of the plastic cup. I didn't drink on the rim, but used a straw. Upon seeing the red line, I poured the drink out in my driveway. I asked my father if he thought it was blood, and he told me he thought it was paint, but to try to clean it off under the sink to find out. Can you get HIV from dried blood on the rim of a plastic cup? I have cracked skin on my middle finger. As I was washing, I started thinking to myself "Suppose if the the dried blood splashed back into one's eye?" I was wearing glasses, but I was wondering if dried blood, if cleaned off, could give a person HIV if it splashes back into their eye (s). Could it be transmissible if someone placed the cup under the faucet to clean the rim (or anywhere on the cup)? If you say HIV dies once it hits the air, could it be brought back to life if someone washes an object such as a cup, and the once dried blood became wet and splashed back into their eye (s)? Thank you.
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Anonymous
Hello, and thank you for contacting AIDS Vancouver and I am happy to help answer your question.

As you have mentioned already, the HIV virus cannot survive outside of the body as it dies once exposed to air. Once the virus has died from exposure to air, you cannot revive it again. So, your contact with dried blood has no risk for acquiring HIV, so there is nothing for you to worry.

I hope I was able to help you and please visit our website at http://www.aidsvancouver.org to find more information about HIV transmission.

All the best,

Risa, Helpline Volunteer
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