Anonymous
hey
i met this girl few months ago. the first time we had sex was after few weeks we met.. we used condoms for veginal sex and no condoms for oral sex...
right after the first time we met i asked her to take an hiv test and she took a duo 4th generation test which came bk non reactive..
now the last time we had sex was almost 3 weeks ago.. and ofcourse we used condoms but not for oral whicho nly lasted few mins...
she took a duo test 4th generationon the 3rd day after we had sex and it cam back negative...
i took a test on 9th day, 12th day and 16th day and all came back negative...
can you please reinsure me that i m safe because my anixty is killing me...
thank you
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Anonymous
Hello and thank you for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline. We are happy to help answer your questions.

It sounds like you are worried about having engaged in sexual activity with a girl you had met a few months ago. It's great that you used a condom during sexual intercourse, it is the most effective way to prevent the transmission of STIs, including HIV. We hope to reassure you that it is very unlikely to have acquired HIV from the activities you have engaged in, using the following information.

ABOUT YOUR EXPOSURE

Sexual intercourse (with a condom) is considered a low-risk activity for acquiring HIV. There have only been a few confirmed reports of HIV being acquired from this activity when risk factors (e.g. broken condom) are present, but this may not apply to your situation. Based on what you have told us, it sounds like your condom stayed in tact during sexual intercourse, and adequately protected you by preventing the exchange of bodily fluids.

Receiving oral sex is considered a negligible-risk activity for acquiring HIV. It seems like you are also concerned that you did not use a condom while receiving oral sex, but there are actually some protective factors that make acquiring HIV from receiving oral sex very unlikely. Also, there have been no confirmed reports of HIV being acquired from receiving oral sex (in BC). Here is why:

*For a risk of HIV transmission to exist, 3/3 parts must be present in an exposure:*

HIV TRANSMISSION EQUATION


BODY FLUID
+
ACTIVITY
+
DIRECT ACCESS TO BLOODSTREAM
---------- -------- ----------------------------
• blood (including menstrual) • unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse • vagina
• semen • sharing needles • anus
• pre-cum • mother to child (in specific cases) • urethra in the penis
• rectal secretions • open cuts and sores (in theory)
• vaginal fluids • other mucosal membranes
• breast milk • points of needle injection
* saliva (spit) is not a bodily fluid that transmits HIV. In fact, a substance (enzymes) in saliva helps stop HIV transmission from happening.

* bodily fluids (e.g. vaginal fluids. pre-cum, semen) cannot pass on HIV after they are exposed to the air

* the urethra (in the penis) does not provide direct access to the bloodstream when it is not contained inside the body (e.g. anus, vagina)

* receiving oral sex is not a high-risk activity

ABOUT HIV TESTING

* the duo test (a.k.a 4th Generation EIA) looks for 2 things (antigens AND antibodies) to indicate if an individual has acquired HIV or not, and should be taken at least 4 weeks post-exposure. The HIV tests you took between 9 and 16 days post-exposure cannot yet provide a reliable indication of your status. However, it is very unlikely that you have acquired HIV from the activities you have engaged in (as explained previously).

* many HIV specialists consider the results of a 4th Generation EIA conclusive as early as 6 weeks post-exposure, and the results of an HIV test taken at that time would be much more reliable.

* the results of an HIV test taken immediately after an exposure does not provide a reliable indication of any person's status; guidelines from the BC CDC suggest that the results of all HIV tests can be considered conclusive at 3 months post-exposure (or later).

* the results of another individual's HIV test does not provide a reliable indication of your HIV status since, there is no way to know about another individual's personal information. The only reliable way to learn your status is to be tested for HIV 3 months after your most recent high-risk activity.

* the duo HIV test (a.k.a. 4th Generation EIA) can give you a good indication of your HIV status earlier than other HIV tests, but the safest measure would be to be tested for HIV again at 3 months post-exposure for conclusive results (BC CDC).


In sum, the things that make HIV transmission likely to happen were not present in the exposure you have described, so it is unlikely that HIV would be acquired in this way. To maintain overall health, we always suggest that sexually active individuals be tested for all STIs, including HIV, regularly to maintain overall health. We would be happy to answer any further questions about HIV testing, and will include a few resources to help connect you to a local healthcare professional in your community,

BC CDC HIV TESTING GUIDELINES: [http://www.bccdc.ca/dis-cond/a-z/_h/HIVAIDS/overview/default.htm#heading5](http://www.bccdc.ca/dis-cond/a-z/_h/HIVAIDS/overview/default.htm#heading5)

ACTIVITIES AND ASSOCIATED RISK: [http://helpline.aidsvancouver.org/question/risk-assessment-chart](http://helpline.aidsvancouver.org/question/risk-assessment-chart)

HIV TESTING IN CANADA: [www.hiv411.ca](www.hiv411.ca)

HIV TESTING IN USA: [www.aids.gov](www.aids.gov)



Thank you for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline.


Sincerely,

Marta

AIDS Vancouver Volunteer


AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online
Monday to Friday 10am-4pm (PST)
1-604-253-0566 ext 299
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