fear99
Hi the below question I asked was posted only as a question with no answer.  Can I get an answer?  It was my third follow up and really anxious.

Team, I am satisfied and thank you for your great service.  I plan on donating.

Below is a thread on previous questions.  I am still confused about the following, and hope to get final facts.

1. You mentioned in your response,

"In the scenario you mentioned, there is not an exchange of bodily fluids that would facilitate HIV transmission. In the extremely rare event that blood from the other individual did enter your mouth, it is worth noting that the saliva in your mouth can "inhibit HIV replication in infected cells and can rapidly kill HIV-infected leukocytes". 

My question to your response is, whether rare or not, if blood  actually got into my mouth is it NO RISK even with small cuts from dentist that i went to BEFORE the sucking of nipple?  I have read online that blood in mouth is a risk, so I am confused that if blood went straight from her nipple into my mouth, and based on "vacuum seal created between mouth and nipple", why is blood in mouth a risk, and yet nipple blood into mouth no risk?

Please understand not trying to be difficult, just want to identify final resolution to this fear I have, and to determine the facts so that seeing other answers where getting or swallowing blood is a risk, yet blood from nipple into my mouth is NO RISK?  Please be detailed.



2.  You mentioned in your response, "Although you clarify that the vacuum seal created between your mouth and your partners nipple, and that you had visited the dentist before the event of nipple noshing had occurred,  the above circumstances still apply. "

My questions to this, is in reality, if my mouth and her nipple are latched is it an air tight vacuum seal, or would air/oxygen still be present and ALSO still kill the HIV inside mouth  along with the saliva?

3. With all of the above for the last time re-stated to you, does your answer still stand as NO RISK?


3. Lastly, I asked this last time but no answer.  Has anyone EVER got HIV from blood into mouth, from a nipple or just blood into mouth?

Please still very concerned.  Also thank you for your past answers, and this great service.



Hi there, I asked the below question and you answered. at below threat and first Q&A

I believe the great volunteer who answered thought i went to the dentist AFTER the encounter.  The fact is I went to the dentist BEFORE going to the strip joint.

Can you answer each question below in same format by listing 1-5 with detail?  

So again.  My questions are:

1. Because i went to dentist BEFORE I went to strip joint, and due to the picking and removing plaque, cleaning and flossing of my teeth, there was blood while I was at dentist when I rinsed my mouth after the cleaning so therefore small cuts.  I have read that cuts have to be big enough to require medical attention such as stitches in my mouth for their to be any risk?Is that true?    So, if blood entered my mouth at strip joint AFTER the dentist with these small cuts, can I get HIV?

2.. Nipple noshing as you called it below.  If my mouth was on a nipple without pulling my mouth off, literally sucking vs licking, and not removing my lips form her nipple for like a minute long, would that provide an airless environment like a needle syringe and create risk?

 
3. If my mouth had these small cuts, and if later that day the strippers nipple bled into my mouth, while my mouth was latched on to nipple,  is this still a no risk and why?  Is this then with all proper facts given, still a zero risk, or is it a low risk, or high risk?  Below you said no risk, is the answer still the same?

4. Has their ever been any reported transmission of HIV from noshing on a womens nipple in any shape, way or form with any circumstances, including bleeding from nipple etc?  (Excluding breast feeding obviously.)

5. Is their any combination at all from this encounter that it would be a risk?


Please be very detailed I am very nervous.


Hi there

I was at a strip joint last year, and got a private dance and sucked the nipple of a stripper.

I was very very drunk.  I did go to dentist that day (afternoon) for normal cleaning which causes bleeding when they pick at your teeth to remove plaque and floss etc

So my worries are:

1. If during the act of sucking her nipple, any blood came out of her nipple into my mouth, can I be at risk?  Especially since I went to the dentist?  I doubt I would taste anything because I was really drunk.

2. I understand that oxygen kills it, but if my mouth was on her nipple while sucking and not exposed to the air (mouth over her nipple), and blood came into my mouth, wouldn't that be airless?

3. Is this low risk, high risk, or zero risk?

Worried.........please answer soon in detail?
 
 
Hi there,

Thank you for your inquiry. From what we gather from the question, you were asking about the possibility of HIV transmission after potentially being exposed to blood from nipple noshing (sucking).

From the information given, this scenario is determined to be No Risk 
(transmission of HIV is not possible in the given scenario).

According to the HIV Transmission Equation (see image below), HIV transmission requires HIV particles in a bodily fluid (e.g. vaginal fluids, blood, semen, etc.) to have direct access to the bloodstream through a High, Low, or Negligible Risk activity.

In the scenario you mentioned, there is not an exchange of bodily fluids that would facilitate HIV transmission. In the extremely rare event that blood from the other individual did enter your mouth, it is worth noting that the saliva in your mouth can "inhibit HIV replication in infected cells and can rapidly kill HIV-infected leukocytes" (1).

You mentioned that you went to the dentist and you are worried about bleeding gums, etc. however, since this happened likely several hours following your encounter, any hypothetical HIV particles that would have been in your mouth would have been inactivated by this time, negating the risk of an entry point into your bloodstream.

Nipple noshing (sucking) only presents a serious risk for HIV transmission when a new mother living with HIV breastfeeds her infant.

Recommendation: No need for HIV test with the scenario provided, refer to a healthcare professional for other health-related questions.
 
 
Hi there,

Thank you for your response. 

We have considered the new information that you have provided. We maintain that this scenario is determined to be of No Risk (HIV transmission is not possible in the given scenario). 

This scenario is determined to be 
No Risk for the following reasons:

In the scenario you mentioned, there is not an exchange of bodily fluids that would facilitate HIV transmission. In the extremely rare event that blood from the other individual did enter your mouth, it is worth noting that the saliva in your mouth can "inhibit HIV replication in infected cells and can rapidly kill HIV-infected leukocytes" (1).

Nipple noshing (sucking) only presents a serious risk for HIV transmission when a new mother living with HIV breastfeeds her infant.

Although you clarify that the vacuum seal created between your mouth and your partners nipple, and that you had visited the dentist before the event of nipple noshing had occurred,  the above circumstances still apply. 

Recommendation: No need for HIV test with the scenario provided, refer to a healthcare professional for other health-related questions.

Saliva (1)
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helpline-volunteer
Hi there,

Thank you for your inquiry. I will attempt to provide some further clarification to your questions.

I apologize if my previous answer was taken slightly a bit out of context. You are correct in that there should not be a distinguishing factor between the location from which the blood entered the mouth from (i.e., whether it was from a nipple or another location). According to the CDC, the chances of HIV transmission if HIV-infected blood is splashed in the eye, nose, or mouth are about 1 out of 1,000 (1). Furthermore, small wounds in the mouth do not pose a risk for HIV transmission. In addition, as I mentioned previously and has been noted in numerous studies, saliva has a significant virus inhibiting function.  

You mentioned that you were confused about the circumstances in which blood in the mouth may pose a higher risk level for HIV transmission. Oral ulcers, bleeding gums, and other large "open cuts and abrasions in the mouth can create an entry point for HIV and increase the risk of transmission" (2). This is the reason why there are some situations and circumstances where HIV transmission is more likely when blood is in the mouth.

The fact that there was a "vacuum" created between your mouth and the nipple and whether or not oxygen would inactivate HIV particles is not really relevant to this question, due to the fact that saliva contains enzymes that break down the virus and the mucous membranes in the mouth are amongst the most protective mucous membranes in the body (2). 

The reason why your situation is considered to be of Negligible Risk is due to the fact that we assume the small cuts in your mouth from your dentist visit were NOT open and bleeding, and therefore are unable to provide a large enough entry way to allow direct access of HIV particles into your bloodstream, a necessary component of the HIV Transmission Equation (see image below).

To conclude, at the AIDS Vancouver Helpline, we evaluate our submissions on a case by case basis, and we believe that your cuts weren't large enough to give you a higher risk assessment. However, we are a volunteer-run service, and although we are highly trained, if you are anxious about your status and feel as if you are at risk of HIV transmission, I would advise you to seek HIV screening at your earliest convenience and/or to seek counsel from a healthcare professional.

Recommendation: There is no evidence or no documented cases of transmission. Refer to a healthcare professional for more personalized answers. 

Take care,
AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online, Shirley

If you are satisfied with the Helpline service, please consider donating.

Helpline Transmission Equation .jpg
Additional Resources:
(1) Updated U.S. Public Health Service Guidelines for the Management of Occupational Exposures to HIV and Recommendations for Postexposure Prophylaxis
(2) HIV TRANSMISSION
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