Anonymous
long story short, after a couple of french kisses, I proceed to finger her with a slight cut that burned slightly and them some oral sex which only featured one or two licks, then attempted to insert my penis (not hard) in her briefly and failed then she attempted oral sex on me but gave up after me not getting hard..
I suffered from a dry sore throat 2 weeks in and a one day long fever. No other symptoms arise so far besides bad breath which I remember having the day of the infection because I asked for tooth paste and a slight white tongue which a doctor denied being oral thrush.. also one painful gland under the chin which didn't hurt until I checked for swollen glands about 25 times.
I had bloodwork done for antibodies and antigens done 3 weeks in after the day of risk, and then I preformed an oral swab test a couple days later (both returned negative), her on the other hand had a HIV test 2 month prior and another oral swab one when I did.. They both returned negative which scares me even more because acute infections carry the most virus..
Am I at risk of anything or am I being delusional?
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Anonymous
Hi there, and thanks a lot for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline for your HIV/AIDS related health information. It seems you're concerned about the possibility of HIV transmitting during an encounter. We're happy to answer your question for you.

You describe a few activities you're questioning. Kissing (even French kissing) is a no risk activity. HIV does not transmit through activities such as these. Fingering (even if you had a cut on your finger) is also a no risk activity. Receiving oral sex is considered a negligible risk activity, meaning that while transmission is theoretically possible, no transmissions have been observed to occur this way. To see the risks associated with these and other various activities, we encourage you to check out our [risk assessment page](http://helpline.aidsvancouver.org/question/risk-assessment-chart). To get a better understanding of what needs to occur for HIV transmission, we'd also encourage you to check out our transmission equation:
HIV TRANSMISSION EQUATION



You'll see in the chart that both tests are considered conclusive 3 months (or 12 weeks) post-exposure. So both were done too soon to assess if a transfer occured in this exposure, but again considering the risks involved we'd suggest further testing is not necessary. As for the point about a negative HIV test somehow indicating that the individual has an acute infection, we'd say that a negative test would mean there is not sufficient levels of the markers of an infection to give a positive result, so would not increase the risk of transmission.

Thanks a lot for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline with your question, we hope it has been answered fully.

Trevor

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online

helpline.aidsvancouver.org**
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BODY FLUID
+
ACTIVITY
+
DIRECT ACCESS TO BLOODSTREAM
---------- -------- ----------------------------
• blood (including menstrual) • unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse • vagina
• semen • sharing needles • anus
• pre-cum • mother to child (in specific cases) • urethra in the penis
• rectal secretions • open cuts and sores (in theory)
• vaginal fluids • other mucosal membranes
• breast milk • points of needle injection
You'll see that required for transfer are all of a fluid involved in transfer, an activity involved in transfer, and direct access to the bloodstream. This is why those risks have been associated with those activities.

As for the symptoms you are experiencing, we at AIDS Vancouver are not healthcare providers, so cannot comment on them. However, HIV infections are never diagnosed based on symptoms alone, simply because the symptoms of an HIV infection are quite common to many other common medical conditions. Testing is the only way to diagnose an HIV infection. If you're concerned about any symptoms you're experiencing, we'd encourage you to see a healthcare provider.

We've gone over the risks associated with encounter, but we will now explain the window period of the tests you've had since then. Here is a bit more information on the tests you've had since then:

= RISK OF HIV TRANSMISSION
Test Name Method Window Period Conditions
Rapid or “Point-of-Care” Blood or oral swab test that looks for antibodies. Up to 95% of infections are detectable within 4-6 weeks post exposure. Most people develop detectable antibodies in 21-25 days. The rapid test is a type of 3rd Generation test. Two forms available: finger prick blood sample or oral swab. Oral swab test is most common in the U.S. but due to false positives in Canada it is not approved and blood collection is more likely. Many places in the U.S. and abroad may charge a fee for rapid testing. Conclusive at 3 months post exposure
EIA (Enzyme Immunoassay) antibody 3rd Generation aka ELISA Blood test that looks for antibodies 4 weeks to 3 months (although up to 95% of infections are detectable within 4-6 weeks). Most people develop detectable antibodies in 21-25 days. Most commonly available testing method. We are encouraged to hear that 4th gen tests are on their way to Vancouver but currently are only available via referral. Conclusive 3 months post exposure |