nyy20
Hi,

I would appreciate your general explanation about broken and cracked skin on body(Legs, hands, buttock, back).
How can I distiniguish exactly when broken and cracked skin on body poses increased HIV risk when coming direct contact
with infected HIV fresh blood or vaginal fluid, and when the broken and cracked skin on body does not put me in HIV risk when coming
direct contact with infected HIV fresh blood or vaginal fluid.

In which level and depth of broken and cracked skin on body the HIV risk increases
when coming direct contact with Infected HIV fresh blood or vaginal fluid?

Your answer will help me ease my mind about estimating the HIV risk in future events
when me and the girl are naked during foreplay or something similar.

Thank you for the help.
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helpline-volunteer
Hi there,

Thank you for your question about general HIV transmission from broken/cracked skin being exposed to fluids that could possibly contain HIV.

Generally speaking, there are three components necessary in order for there to be a chance of HIV transmission. These components consist of fluids, a high-risk activity and direct access to enter the blood stream. Open wounds do provide access to the blood stream, but there are other factors to keep in mind as well. When fluids containing the HIV virus are exposed to air, they rapidly undergo reduction in HIV viral concentration (1). If the wound is actively bleeding and is deep then there might be an increased chance that transmission could occur provided the other components of our HIV Transmission Equation (see below) are met. The skin has many protective components that help in preventing bacteria and viruses from entering the body (sweat, oil, enzymes etc). Simply cracked skin that is not bleeding should not provide a risk of transmission occurring due to the other mechanisms that break down HIV (environmental and our own bodies).

There is no specific level or depth of a wound that determines the risk of transmission. Using a condom is a known way to help decrease the risk of transmission provided that it is used properly (2).

Please refer to our HIV Transmission Equation below for more information:
Helpline Transmission Equation .jpg 
Resources:
(1) Reference 1
(2) Reference 2

Thank you,
AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online, Shawn

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