Anonymous
i Will try to be as specific as possible with few words.

13 days ago visited a professional woman with whom:

1. She gave protected oral sex using a condom. I think this action is low risk
2. i had protected sex with her using a condom. I think this action is also low risk. After the sex we both checked the condom and everything was ok.
3. I performed unprotected oral sex to her for about 1-2 minutes. The problem is that about 30-35 minutes before this activity i accidentally bite my lips from inside when i was eating which casued a bleeding for 2-3 minutes (also i had drink some beers that night). My problem is how risky was the oral sex considering the wound in my lip.Do you consider this as open bleeding wound that would provide a access to HIV in my blood stream? I can't understand how you define the risky wounds and cuts inside the mouth. please calrify

Also
- 4 days after this incident i got a rapid test which was negatine (non-reactive) bu the window for this is 3-months
- 9 days after that i took a duo test which was negative.

Can you please provide an answer because i'm fully stressed and i can't slip. The CDC is my country says that probably i do not have nothing but i am very afraid.
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Anonymous
Hi there and thank you for reaching out to AIDS Vancouver with your questions! We're happy to help.

1. Receiving oral sex is actually considered to be a negligible risk activity, meaning that while it is theoretically possible to acquire HIV in this scenario, there has never been a confirmed report.

2. Protected sex is indeed considered a low risk activity, meaning that there have been a few reports of infection attributed to these activities (usually under certain identifiable conditions).

3. Giving oral sex is ALSO considered to be a low risk activity. The bite on your lip has no impact on the risk of HIV transmission. In order for a cut or sore to provide direct access to the bloodstream, the cut needs to be gushing blood and require immediate and professional medical attention. Since your cut does not match this description, it does not provide direct access to the bloodstream.

Here is some information regarding the two tests that you took:


Test Name Method Window Period Conditions
Rapid or “Point-of-Care” Blood or oral swab test that looks for antibodies. Up to 95% of infections are detectable within 4-6 weeks post exposure. Most people develop detectable antibodies in 21-25 days. Two forms of rapid test available: finger prick blood sample or oral swab. Oral swab test is most common in the U.S. but in Canada it is not approved and blood collection is more likely. Many places in the U.S. and abroad may charge a fee for rapid testing. Conclusive at 3 months post exposure.

If you want a conclusive answer regarding your HIV status, you would have to re-test 3 months after your most recent exposure.

I hope I have answered your questions, and feel free to contact us with any further concerns.

Regards,

Sierra, Helpline Volunteer

AIDS Vancouver Online Helpline

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Test Name Method Window Period Conditions
4th Generation EIA Blood test that looks for antibodies AND p24 protein antigens. Commonly referred to as the "combination," "combo" or "DUO" test. P24 protein is detectable immediately after infection but only for the first few weeks. The antibody (ab) test has a window period of 4-12 weeks post exposure. This test is widely available in North America. Most HIV specialists consider this test to be conclusive at 6 weeks but official HIV testing guidelines still recommend re-testing at 12 weeks for conclusive results. Conclusive at 3 months post exposure.