Anonymous
Had a night of drunken sex with a girl who is known to be very promiscuous. She openly told me she did not care if I wore a condom. After the first round during which she said "she came" we had sex for a second time. At the very beginning of the second time the condom snapped all the way back to the shaft and did not realize for about 15-25 seconds. Once I removed the broken one, placed a new one on and finished the act. At about 17 days I went to see my family doctor and had bloodwork done and asked for him to check for sti's/stds/hiv. The test came back negative. I also retested at 23 days due to my own anxiety. I know it may be too early but my anxiety is eating away at me and I believe I am making myself feel sick. What is the likelihood I could have contracted hiv with this exposure?

For about 2 weeks it feels like there is a golfball in my throat. There is no white spots/puss or soreness just feels like something is stuck there. Strep analysis came back negative. I also have this sensation at the tip of my private area (tingling but no burning). A part of me knows that this is all probably because of anxiety but I cannot help it.

I've read a lot of ports on this site but it is not helping me.
Please help, any information would be appreciated.

Thank you.
J
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Anonymous
Thank you for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline. I understand you're concerned about your recent experience, and I will be more than glad to answer your questions.

As you may already know, having unprotected sex is a "high risk" activity for HIV transmission. Therefore, we highly recommend being tested at least after 12 weeks post-exposure, which is considered a "conclusive" test. That being said, your test at 23 days is a very strong indication that your HIV status is negative (about 95% accuracy). This is because over 95% of people that have newly acquired HIV would test positive around 21-25 days. So hopefully this test should significantly ease your mind until your 12 week test.

As for your symptoms, we do not use any symptoms to diagnose or indicate an HIV status. Many people that acquire HIV has no symptoms, and others may have symptoms that can mirror other infections such as a cold or a flu, and therefore using symptoms is very inaccurate. Testing is the only way to know your HIV status.


Sincerely,

Ali

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online

Monday-Friday 9am-5pm (PST)

1 844 INFO-HIV (Toll free Canada & U.S.)

helpline@aidsvancouver.org

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