robi2000
Hi,

I have had an encounter which I am concerned about and I would appreciate your professional advice.
I am aware that frottage is a no HIV risk encounter,
however recently a woman and I preformed frottage just as she began her period(menstural time).

I was not wearing a condom and I have a circumised penis.
The woman was rubbing her bare vagina on all over my penis,
including urethra and penis head and penis shaft.
Some of her menstrual blood came in contact with my urethra and my penis head.
She was above me and the urethra and penis head were pressed against her vagina,
but not penetrating her.

However, I am concerned that because of the close proximity,
some of the blood would have still carried infectious/viable HIV,
and therefore when her blood dripped down,
it made HIV transmission possible through my exposed urethra and penis head.

I think that my urethra and penis head and her vagina formed an environment with no air at all,
from being pressed so close together,
then this would have kept the HIV virus in her blood infectious and make HIV infection possible
through particularly my urethra and also through my penis head.

What do you think is the HIV risk from my incident which I have described above?


Thank you for your help and great work.
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helpline-volunteer

Hello,

Thank you for your inquiry. From what we gather from the question, you were asking about the risk of HIV infection from urethra exposure to menstrual blood in an environment of no air exposure. From the information given, this scenario is determined to be High Risk (there is evidence of transmission through these activities and are the majority of cases of transmission). 

The scenario mentioned above does meet the components of the transmission equation (image below). In order for HIV transmission to occur, HIV positive fluid (blood, semen, vaginal fluid, anal fluid, breastmilk) must have direct access to the bloodstream through a High, Low, or sometimes Negligible Risk activity. In this case, menstrual blood (a fluid potentially carrying HIV), had direct access to the bloodstream via the urethra during an unprotected sexual activity. Additionally, in this case, the activity describes close contact between the vagina and urethra, making transmission possible due to a lack of air exposure. 

If this activity was performed sooner than 72 hours ago, please refer to a health care provider for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP): https://www.catie.ca/fact-sheets/prevention/post-exposure-prophylaxis-pep.


Recommendation: Please refer to a health care provider for HIV testing and PEP (if it has not yet been 72 hours since the activity described). 

Regards,

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online, Nancy

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