Anonymous
It's always said once the HIV virus in blood is exposed to air/oxygen, it dies immediately. But how is anyone sure of that? Is there any prove to show how long does it survive in air/oxygen or on inanimate materials?
Quote
Anonymous
Greetings, 
Thank you for using the AIDS Vancouver Online Helpline as your source of HIV/AIDS related information. 
The reason we can say that HIV does not survive very long outside of the body is because of the research that has been done on the subject. Scientist have spent 30 years developing tests, and medications for this virus as well as understanding the transmission of the virus. The CDC (Centre for Disease Control) writes: 
"Scientists and medical authorities agree that HIV does not survive well outside the body, making the possibility of environmental transmission remote. HIV is found in varying concentrations or amounts in blood, semen, vaginal fluid, breast milk, saliva, and tears. To obtain data on the survival of HIV, laboratory studies have required the use of artificially high concentrations of laboratory-grown virus. Although these unnatural concentrations of HIV can be kept alive for days or even weeks under precisely controlled and limited laboratory conditions, CDC studies have shown that drying of even these high concentrations of HIV reduces the amount of infectious virus by 90 to 99 percent within several hours. Since the HIV concentrations used in laboratory studies are much higher than those actually found in blood or other specimens, drying of HIV-infected human blood or other body fluids reduces the theoretical risk of environmental transmission to that which has been observed–essentially zero. Incorrect interpretations of conclusions drawn from laboratory studies have in some instances caused unnecessary alarm.
Results from laboratory studies should not be used to assess specific personal risk of infection because (1) the amount of virus studied is not found in human specimens or elsewhere in nature, and (2) no one has been identified as infected with HIV due to contact with an environmental surface. Additionally, HIV is unable to reproduce outside its living host (unlike many bacteria or fungi, which may do so under suitable conditions), except under laboratory conditions; therefore, it does not spread or maintain infectiousness outside its host."
To summarize, HIV needs really specific conditions to survive outside the body. Typically air tight and climate controlled. As far as inanimate objects, needles are found to be one place the virus can survive a bit longer. This is due to the airtight space between the needle tip and the plunger also known as the "sweet spot".
 
I hope I was able to address all of your concerns, but please feel free to contact us again with any further questions. 
In Health, 
Katie 
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer
E-mail: helpline@aidsvancouver.org
Phone (Mon-Fri 9-4pm): (604) 696-4666
Web: http://www.aidsvancouver.org/helpline
 
 
Quote

ABOUT THE HELPLINE | SUPPORT OUR WORK | RISK ASSESSMENT CHART | ANONYMOUS TESTING | DISCLAIMER | CONTACT

Charitable Registration #
10668 9896 RR0001


© 2019 helpline.aidsvancouver.org
Privacy Policy
Disclaimer

OUR ADDRESS

1101 Seymour Street
Suite 235, 2nd Floor
Vancouver, BC V6B 0R1
Canada


GET IN TOUCH

Main Phone: 604-893-2201
Fax: 604-893-2205
Email: contact@aidsvancouver.org