Anonymous
I had a very unpleasant situation. I had sex with a girl and my condom broke, after that I noticed that she had also a period. I took a shower after ~15 minutes when I went home, but I'm really scared to death. Of course I will do HIV test but do you know what is the probability of HIV transmission with that risk factor like menstruation.

I've read about probability for insertive vaginal and anal sex. And as I roughly estimated - it would be something about 2% (?) chance or even lower with a single exposure of positive woman. But it's only a guess.

I've asked because when I compare probability of transmission with the overall number of estimated infected people in my country (~40000) and the population (40 mln) the overall hiv transmission of that exposure would be something about 1 over 50000.

Thanks for help
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Anonymous
Hi there, and thanks a lot for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline for your HIV/AIDS related health information. It seems you have some questions about the risks involved during an encounter, considering the condom broke. We're happy to answer your questions.

Sex without a condom (as is sex when the condom breaks) is considered a high risk activity. This means that of the transmissions that have occurred, most have occurred during activities such as these. It does not mean that a transmission occurred in your case. To see the risks associated with many common activities, we encourage you to check out our [risk assessment page](http://helpline.aidsvancouver.org/question/risk-assessment-chart).

If you check out the statistics the [CDC](http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/risk/estimates/riskbehaviors.html) in the US provide, you can see that the risk is 4 transfers per 10,000 exposures. This means that 4 transfers occur for every 10,000 instances of unprotected sex. Things like sharing needles have 63 transfers per 10,000 exposures. This sounds a lot lower than the risk actually is, as if you do this multiple times the risk multiplies each time.

Considering this is a high risk exposure, we would still recommend you seek out testing as soon as you can. We recommend you see a healthcare provider for further information on when you should go for testing, but know that most tests are not considered conclusive until 3 months, or 90 days post exposure. You'll need to wait this long to know your status conclusively after this encounter.

Thanks for contacting the AIDS Vancouver Helpline with your question, it was actually a really interesting one. We hope it has been answered fully.

Trevor

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online

helpline.aidsvancouver.org
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