Anonymous
Hi,

6 days ago I fingered a prostitute and engaged in vaginal sex (with a condom).

For the last 4 days in the mornings I have felt OK, but after noon getting a bit tired (at work I want to take a break quite often, very hard to focus on work because of my worrying) and falling asleep early (at around 9 PM, but sleeping well). I feel good in the mornings, but as the day progresses, I start getting fluctuating visual problems (it is sometimes a bit harder to sharpen focus with my sight), but it all goes back to normal very quickly and then appears mildly again. My eyes look OK. But the visual problems make me worry the most. Throughout this whole time I am super nervous and thinking about having possibly contracted HIV all of the time.

Can visual problems be a sign of early HIV?
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Anonymous
Hello,

Thank you for your inquiry. From what we gather from the question, you were asking about the symptoms and risk of acquisition of HIV through protected vaginal sex. From the information given, this scenario is determined to be Low Risk. Evidence of transmission occurs through these activities when certain conditions are met example: vaginal sex with a condom due to improper use and potential breakage of the condom.

In order to acquire HIV the following conditions must be met:
There must be HIV present in a bodily fluid. The five bodily fluids that carry the HIV virus include: blood, semen (including pre-ejaculate), vaginal fluids, breast milk, and rectal secretions.
The bodily fluid containing HIV must have direct access to the bloodstream. This can be through cuts, tears, rips, mucous membranes, open sores, or needles.
Transmission occurs through a risky activity in which the first two conditions are met. For example: condom less sex, sharing needles, unsafe tattoos or piercings, vertical transmission–from mother to child (in utero, during delivery, breastfeeding).

HIV tends to mirror other viral infections (flu etc..), usually someone will get a strong flu like illness 2-6 weeks after infection but not all people do. Testing is therefore the only way to know.

Recommendation: Refer to Physician for HIV test.

Regards,
AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online,
(Vardah)

Additional Resources:
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