Anonymous
In January I had protected vaginal sex with a commercial sex worker. However, she performed oral sex on me without condom and I fingered her. The next day I had unprotected sex with my wife.

About a week later I got the flu and a couple of days later my wife had the same. Days later I started to have night sweats and my underarms started to bother me. My wife told me she was feeling exhausted for no reason and her underarm lymph nodes were swollen.

Since then until today I have had many things like muscle pain, my skin itches, dermatitis on my face, chest, and in my inner legs next to my testicles, and folliculitis on my pubic area which I never had before on my life among other things.

On late March my wife had headache and eye pain for about ten days. Then she got a sore throat with red points on her tongue and a rare skin rash in the form of a circle on one of her breasts. Since 3 days ago she has her knees swollen with burning sensation

I talked to the prostitute (*commercial sex trade worker)* but she does not want to test which I believe is because she knows she is HIV positive.

I have tested for syphilis and herpes and they were negative. I have read that oral sex and fingering are not methods of HIV transmission but why all these symptoms on me and my wife? In her case it cannot be a sign of stress and anxiety since she does not knows of my relationship with the sexual worker

I normally bite my nails and pull them. I think I did that just before fingering and caused a small cut on my finger. I also have long fingers and fingered her deep in her vagina for about a minute

Am I at risk for HIV ?.
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Anonymous
Thank you for contacting AIDS Vancouver. It sounds like the symptoms your wife and you are experiencing have been unpleasant, and you are feeling anxious about acquiring HIV. I hope the following information will help you understand your situation better.

1) Symptoms are not good or reliable indicators of HIV because other viral infections have similar symptoms as HIV, and HIV itself may not present any symptoms. That said, if you are experiencing unusual symptoms you may want to partner with your doctor separate from your concerns about HIV. The only way to be certain if you have acquired HIV is through testing.

2) The best indicator of HIV are results of HIV tests given by qualified health care professionals. Whether or not an HIV test would be required depends the risks of the activities you engaged in, not symptoms.

3) Receiving oral sex and fingering are both activities that carry a Negligible Risk, which means that there have been no confirmed reports of a person acquiring HIV through either of these activities.

4) The risk of acquiring HIV from protected vaginal sex is Low Risk, which means that there have been some confirmed reports of acquiring HIV through this activity under certain identifiable conditions that may or may not apply in this case (ex: the condom breaking during intercourse or the presence of other STIs). If certain identifiable conditions did not apply, then the risk is considered Low.

5) While an HIV test would not be required for the activities you mentioned, we encourage all sexually active people to get regular testing for STIs including HIV to promote their sexual health. In addition, if taking a test would provide you with more peace of mind, you can partner with a health care provider to see what your testing options are.

I hope this has helped you better understand your situation and addressed the concerns you have. If you have further questions, you can explore our website or call us for immediate assistance with general inquiries.

Yours in health,
Matt Volunteer

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online

Mon-Fri: 10am-4pm (PST)


604-253-0566 x299
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