Anonymous
I had oral sex with an individual who is hiv positive, but he did not ejaculate in my mouth. I did have cracked, chapped lips and a small sore where I bit my lip a few days ago at the time, but they weren't bleeding. If I came in contact with his pre-ejaculate, but he did not ejaculate in my mouth, am I at a realistic risk of contracting hiv? Also, the last time I had unprotected sex with him was 5 weeks ago and I had a 4th generation rapid hiv test done two days ago that came back negative. I was told to retest in one month. Is a negative test at 5 weeks a good indication of what my results will be in 4 weeks?
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Anonymous
Hello and thank you for using the AIDS Vancouver Helpline as a source for HIV/AIDS-related information.

Giving oral sex is a low risk activity for HIV transmission, even if he did not ejaculate in your mouth, as pre-ejaculate can transmit the virus. This means that there is a potential for HIV transmission because there is a potential for the exchange of body fluids, however, there have only been a few reports of HIV being transmitted in this way. Based on this activity, I would recommend consulting a healthcare professional for HIV testing.

Unprotected sex is a high risk activity for HIV transmission, and therefore I would recommend HIV testing. Please note that a 4th generation HIV test and a Rapid test are two different HIV tests. Both tests are very reliable and very accurate. The 4th generation test has a window period of 4-12 weeks. Therefore, a negative test result at 5 weeks is a good indication of your status. However, World Health Organization guidelines require HIV testing (for all types of HIV testing) at 12 weeks post-exposure to receive conclusive results.

Please note that a person who is known to be HIV positive may be on antiretroviral treatment. If your partner is on antiretroviral treatment, the risk of HIV transmission decreases significantly. This is because the viral load would be lowered, making the virus more difficult to transmit. However, as mentioned above, I would still recommend that you consult a healthcare professional for HIV testing.

I hope that I have addressed your concerns. Please feel free to contact us again should you have any further questions.

In health,

Natalie

AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer

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