Anonymous
I received an oral blowjob and I just got tested using SD bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 168 days after the exposure and the result is negative.

1. Should I be infected if there's a bleeding gums or a blood in the saliva of my partner?

2. Should I re tested again?

Really worried.
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Anonymous
Hi there! Thank you for contacting the AIDS Vancouver helpline with your HIV related concerns and questions.

I understand you're worried about your exposure and testing to HIV, so hopefully this answer will be able to help you.

In regards to the activity, receiving oral sex is considered a Negligible Risk activity. What this means is that although technically you can make a case for it, there has never been a single reported case in British Columbia.

1) Receiving oral sex with blood present can increase the risk of transmission, however because saliva contains and enzyme that helps break down HIV, it's still very unlikely that it would be transmitted this way.

2) Your test was taken 168 days after exposure, and since all tests are considered conclusive after 3 months, you do not need to be tested again. The only exceptions are as follows:

- you're on antiretroviral treatment for Hepatitis C

-you're on treatment for cancer (chemotherapy)

-you're on PEP/PREP Treatment for HIV

or
-you have an immunodeficiency disease (you would know, you are usually diagnosed in infancy).

In these cases, the tests become conclusive at 6 months (168 days) in which case your result is still considered conclusive. Either way, you do not need to be tested again.

I have attached the HIV Transmission Equation for future reference, which shows that all 3 categories are necessary for risk of HIV transmission:

HIV TRANSMISSION EQUATION


BODY FLUID
+
ACTIVITY
+
DIRECT ACCESS TO BLOODSTREAM
---------- -------- ----------------------------
• blood (including menstrual) • unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse • vagina
• semen • sharing needles • anus
• pre-cum • mother to child (in specific cases) • urethra in the penis
• rectal secretions • open cuts and sores (in theory)
• vaginal fluids • other mucosal membranes
• breast milk • points of needle injection
Additionally, check out the BC CDC HIV Testing guidelines [HERE](http://www.bccdc.ca/NR/rdonlyres/B35EDEBD-98CA-48BB-AB7C-B18A357AC19D/0/HIV_GUIDE_051114.pdf).

Thanks again for your great question, hope I helped!

Sincerely,

Christina

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online

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604 253 0566 Ext. 299

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= RISK OF HIV TRANSMISSION