Anonymous
Hi,

I was very drunk and had a csw on top of me and were just rubbing genital areas.  I think I passed out for a while because next thing I remember is her swaying on top of me like we're having sex, but only I could not feel any warmth (like one would feel if penis enters vagina).  But when I grabbed my penis to check, it seemed the top half was in somewhere and was rather tight, but no warmth.  Must have passed out again because next thing I remember was her leaving.

Next day, I figured one of three things could have happened:  (1) unprotected vaginal and her vagina was very dry and hence could feel no warmth, (2) unprotected anal - have never done this so dont know what I would have felt.  But would imagine that I would have remembered if my penis was inserted into her anus without lubrication and am sure even that cavity would be warm.  But it sure would explain the tightness I remember and just part of penis being "in" somewhere.  (3) Just rubbing and thats it.

Well, I had a rash on my penis next morning on left side (glans) and inner foreskin which seemed to be there due to trauma/irritation.  So, while I would have preferred it being option 3, seems like its either 1 or 2.

She's from a high HIV prevalence area, so really worried.  I did start PEP.  Really wish I could deduce which option it was...
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helpline-volunteer

Hello,


Thank you for your inquiry. From what we gather from the question, you were asking about the risk of acquiring HIV after engaging in genital rubbing and possible unprotected insertive sex. From the information given, this scenario is determined to be High Risk (there is evidence of transmission through these activities and are the majority of cases of transmission).

The scenario mentioned above does meet the three components of the transmission equation. Even if only rubbing occurred, there is a chance that vaginal fluid could have gained direct access to your bloodstream through your urethra.
Helpline Transmission Equation .jpgIt was very responsible of you to access PEP after engaging is a possible risky activity, especially since you are not certain of the full extent of the activity. PEP reduces the risk of HIV transmission by more than 80%, and effectiveness is likely much higher if used as early as possible (within 72 hours) and used consistently and correctly as prescribed (1). After you have completed a full course of PEP, access testing outside of the window period (day 1 is the first day post-PEP, not post-exposure).

Recommendation: Refer to a health care provider for HIV testing outside of the window period after PEP.  


Regards,

AIDS Vancouver Helpline/Online, Marie
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