Anonymous
I have had several negative rapid blood tests at an his clinic after beginning at four months and finally at 16 months after beginning to feel ill. The last test was in June, 2013. I began feeling ill in February, 2012. I have been suffering from many classic his symptoms the whole time. Of course I have tested for everything else numerous times. I just had my annual physical and all the blood work including red blood and white blood are all normal.
If the Rapid tests had failed to detect the Hiv infection I am totally convinced I have, would my white blood cell count be affected because of fighting the Hiv ? I have had rashes on my arms and the ornery of my mouth and flaky skin the whole time. I feel weak and ill every waking hour and can get no relief or help frm drs. Peripheral neuropathy of all types cause me pain , burning, numbness, weakness, no temperature control, serious vision loss and absolutely no sense of taste and smell. My wife and I no longer have sex because I have no desire and when we did, it was very painful for me even with a condom. She is upset .
He sees me every month and just keeps saying all tests are normal do sit must be in my head.
I cannot believe that these tests are normal.


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Anonymous
Greetings,

Keep in mind that HIV testing is completely conclusive at the 12 week mark (84 days) following an initial exposure, if no other instances of exposure occurred between that time. The ONLY exceptions to that rule are as follows:
-A person is being treated for cancer
-A person is being treated for Hepatitis
-A person has a pre existing immunodeficiency disorder, diagnosed at birth or during infancy
-A person is taking PEP or PrEP treatment

Symptoms are no indication of ones status, as every person's body responds differently-testing is the only way to confirm a person's HIV status. The good news is, if these symptoms were indeed being caused by the virus, it would most certainly be present within your blood tests. HIV cannot lay dormant in a person's body, going undetected by testing, it quickly, rapidly multiplies, taking over your white blood cells and making it very easy to find within your system. Typically symptoms are only during the first 2 weeks of infection-as your symptoms have lasted this long, this also does not fit the profile of HIV transmission.

At this point, it sounds like you have convinced yourself that you are living with HIV. It also sounds like it is taking a large toll on your health, relationships, and lifestyle. Outside of providing you with the facts about HIV, as I did above, I am not certain there is any more information that we will be able to provide. You may want to consider teaming up with your family doctor, a clinic doctor and perhaps getting in touch with a counsellor. I hear that you are not "getting any relief from doctors", if finding a new one is an option, you may want to consider looking. Some doctor are easier to talk to, or more empathetic to an individuals situation. Some doctors are also better at understanding the massive toll stress and anxiety can take on a person's body.

I hope this helps, even just a little bit. I encourage you to work with your doctors and counsellors to achieve the peace of mind you are seeking with this. Also, if you are able, feel free to give us a call, toll free, here at the helpline. We can discuss the accuracy of testing with you a little bit more in detail, as well as go over your initial risk with you if you are willing. If you are outside of Vancouver, we can also call you back, so as not to have charges accrued to your phone.

All the best,

Katie
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